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C 55.220/2-3:999 



WORLD DATA CENTER 
for Oceanography, Silver Spring 



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CATALOGUE OF DATA 

and 

REPORT OF DATA EXCHANGE 



1999 



WDC-OC-00-1 



World Data Centers conduct international ex- 
change of geophysical observations in accordance 
with the principles set forth by the International 
Council of Scientific Unions. WDCs are established 
in the United States under the auspices of the Na- 
tional Academy of Sciences. 



WORLD DATA CENTER 
for Oceanography, Silver Spring 




CATALOGUE OF DATA 

and 

REPORT OF DATA EXCHANGE 

1999 

CHANGE NOTICE NOS. 64 AND 65 
(1 JANUARY - 31 DECEMBER 1999) 



World Data Center for Oceanography 
Silver Spring, Maryland 

2000 



ABSTRACT 



This publication lists and describes all data received by the WDC for 
Oceanography, Silver Spring, during the period 1 January - 31 Decem- 
ber 1999. It supplements the original six-volume Catalogue of Data , 
which includes Change Notice Nos. 1-16 . It also includes tabulations of 
data received during 1999 as well as summarizations of data received 
prior to 1999. The types of data include oceanographic station data, 
bathythermograph data, current measurements, biological observa- 
tions, meteorological observations, and sea surface measurements. An 
Alphabetical Index of ship names and a Geographical Index of ocean 
areas assist the user in selecting the required data. 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 



E. Godfrey Trammell has announced his intention to retire from the 
Federal Service on 31 December 2000, after more than 33 years as a 
staff member of the World Data Center for Oceanography, Silver 
Spring. 



Compiled by 

Charlotte L. Sazarna 
E. Godfrey Trammell, Jr. 



u 



CONTENTS 

Page 

ABSTRACT ii 

WORLD DATA CENTER iv 

PREFACE vi 

INTRODUCTION 1 

HOW TO USE THE CHANGE NOTICE TO THE CATALOGUE OF DATA 2 

DATA EXCHANGE POLICY OF WDC FOR OCEANOGRAPHY 4 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF DATA SOURCES 6 

EXPLANATION OF THE ALPHABETICAL AND GEOGRAPHICAL 

INDEXES 7 

ALPHABETICAL INDEX 8 

GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 10 

NUMERICAL LIST OF COUNTRIES 14 

LIST OF DATA CENTER ACRONYMS 15 

INDEX OF COUNTRIES AND INSTITUTIONS CONTRIBUTING DATA 
TO WDC FOR OCEANOGRAPHY DURING THE PERIOD 1 JANUARY - 

31 DECEMBER 1999 16 

EXPLANATION OF WDC FOR OCEANOGRAPHY DATA INFORMATION 

SHEET 17 

LISTING OF ACCESSIONED DATA PUBLICATIONS 25 

INTERNATIONAL DATA ACQUISITION AND EXCHANGE 29 

WDC FOR OCEANOGRAPHY DATA BASE SUMMARIES 32 

GODAR ACCESSIONS, 1999 38 

NODC ACCESSIONS, 1999 40 

DATA HOLDINGS OF RNODC's AND SPECIALIZED DATA CENTERS 47 



in 



WORLD DATA CENTER 

The World Data Center consists of the Coordination Office and thirteen subcenters: 

World Data Center U.S.A. 

Coordination Office 
National Academy of Sciences 
2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20418, U.S.A. 

- 

Telephone: (202) 334-2744 
FAX: (202)334-1377 



GLACIOLOGY (SNOW AND ICE) : 

WDC for Glaciology, Boulder 
CIRES, Campus Box 449 
University of Colorado 
Boulder, Colorado 80309, U.S.A. 

Telephone: (303) 492-5171 
FAX: (303)492-2468 

PALEOCLIMATOLOGY : 

WDC for Paleoclimatology 

National Geophysical Data Center 

NOAA/NGDC E/GC4 

325 Broadway 

Boulder, Colorado 80303, U.S.A. 

Telephone: (303) 497-6160 
FAX: (303)497-6513 

ROTATION OF THE EARTH 

WDC for Rotation of the Earth, 
Washington 

Earth Orientation Department 
U.S. Naval Observatory 
Washington, D.C. 20392-5100, U.S.A. 

Telephone: (202) 762-1469 
FAX: (202)762-1563 



OCEANOGRAPHY : 

WDC for Oceanography, Silver Spring 

NOAA/NODC E/OC53 

Silver Spring, MD 20910-3282, U.S.A. 

Telephone: (301) 713-3295 
FAX: (301) 713-3303 

METEOROLOGY : 

WDC for Meteorology, Asheville 

National Climatic Data Center 

NOAA, E/CC 

Federal Building 

151 Patton Avenue 

Asheville, NC 28801-5001, U.S.A. 

Telephone: (704) 271-4474 
FAX: (704)271-4246 

SATELLITE INFORMATION : 

WDC for Satellite Information 
National Space Science Data Center 
Code 633 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center 
Greenbelt, Maryland 20771, U.S.A. 

Telephone: (301) 286-6695 
FAX: (301)286-1635 



IV 



SOLID-EARTH GEOPHYSICS 
(TSUNAMIS. GRAVIMETRY. EARTH 
TIDES. RECENT MOVEMENTS OF 
THE EARTH'S CRUST. MAGNETIC 
MEASUREMENTS. PALEOMAGNE- 
TISM AND ARCHEOMAGNETISM. 
VOLCANOLOGY. GEOTHERMICS) : 

WDC for Solid Earth Geophysics, Boulder 

NOAA/NGDC E/GCl 

325 Broadway 

Boulder, Colorado 80303, U.S.A. 

Telephone: (303)497-6521 
FAX: (303)497-6513 



MARINE GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS 
(GRAVITY. MAGNETICS. BATHYM- 
ETRY. SEISMIC PROFILES. MARINE 
SEDIMENT AND ROCK ANALYSIS) : 

WDC for Marine Geology and 

Geophysics, Boulder 
NOAA/NGDC E/GC3 
325 Broadway 
Boulder, Colorado 80303-3328, U.S.A. 

Telephone: (303) 497-6390 
FAX: (303)497-6513 

ATMOSPHERIC TRACE GASES: 



SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL PHYSICS 
(SOLAR AND INTERPLANETARY 
PHENOMENA. IONOSPHERIC 
PHENOMENA. FLARE-ASSOCIATED 
EVENTS. GEOMAGNETIC VARIATIONS. 
MAGNETOSPHERIC AND INTER- 
PLANETARY MAGNETIC PHENOMENA. 
AURORA. COSMIC RAYS. AIRGLOW) : 

WDC for Solar-Terrestrial Physics, 

Boulder 
NOAA/NGDC E/GC2 
325 Broadway 
Boulder, Colorado 80303, U.S.A. 

Telephone: (303)497-6761 
FAX: (303)497-6513 

HUMAN INTERACTIONS IN THE 
ENVIRONMENT : 

WDC for Human Interactions in the 

Environment 
CIESIN/Columbia University 
P.O. Box 1000 
61 Rt. 9W 
Palisades, NY 10964, U.S.A. 

Telephone: (914)365-8988 
FAX: (914)365-8922 



WDC for Atmospheric Trace Gases 
Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis 

Center 
Oak Ridge National Laboratory 
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6335, U.S.A. 

Telephone: (423) 241-4842 
FAX: (423)574-2232 

REMOTELY SENSED LAND DATA : 

WDC for Remotely Sensed Land Data 

U.S. Geological Survey 

EROS Data Center 

Sioux Falls, SD 57198, U.S.A. 

Telephone: (605)594-6142 
FAX: (605)594-6589 

SEISMOLOGY 

WDC for Seismology, Denver 

U.S. Geological Survey 

Denver Federal Center, MS-967 

P. O. Box 25046 

Denver, Colorado 80225-0046, U.S.A. 



Telephone: 
FAX: 



(303) 273-8500 
(303) 273-8450 



PREFACE 



The six-volume Catalogue of Data and the loose-leaf Change Notice Num- 
bers 1-16 . which have been integrated into the Catalogue , list all oceanographic 
data received by World Data Center for Oceanography, from July 1957 through 
June 1975. The Catalogue has a loose-leaf arrangement of sheets, which have been 
punched for standard three-ring binders. It includes station location charts for 
many cruises. 

Beginning with Change Notice No. 17. each Change Notice is printed in a 
modified format as a separate, bound publication describing all data received dur- 
ing a particular six-month or one-year period. The six-volume Catalogue of Data , 
including Change Notice Nos. 1-16 . continues to serve as a reference volume for 
data received from July 1957 through June 1975. Provision has been made in the 
modified format for correlating newly received data for a particular cruise with data 
previously received for that same cruise and already described in a prior Change 
Notice. The capability for identifying those data, which have been machine-pro- 
cessed by a national, regional, or responsible national oceanographic data center, 
has been retained in the modified catalogue format. 

Until recently, data gathered before the beginning of the IGY in 1957 had 
not been extensively accessioned by World Data Center for Oceanography; how- 
ever, numerous international bodies have pressed the WDCs, Oceanography to 
accession as much historical data as possible, in order to augment the data bases 
required for support of Climate Research and Global Change Programs. Thus, the 
acquisition of pre-IGY, as well as post-IGY data, has become a high priority goal for 
the WDC. The Catalogue now contains pre-IGY data accessioned by the WDC and 
available in automated form to requesters in the international oceanographic com- 
munity. The Global Oceanographic Data Archaeology and Rescue (GODAR) pro- 
gram has generated significant contributions of historical oceanographic observa- 
tions from numerous countries. 

It should be noted that the designations of countries used in this publication 
do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of this Center 
concerning the delineation of the territorial boundaries, the political subdivisions, 
or the legal status of any country or territory. WDC for Oceanography, will make 
every effort to promptly correct any inconsistency that is brought to its attention. 



VI 



INTRODUCTION 



The World Data Center system was established in 1957 to collect data from 
the numerous and widespread observational programs of the International Geo- 
physical Year (IGY) under the principles set forth by the International Council of 
Scientific Unions (ICSU) and to make such data readily accessible for an indefinite 
period of time to interested scientists and scholars. The system consists of World 
Data Centers (WDCs) located in the U.S.A., Russia, Western Europe, Japan and the 
People's Republic of China. The WDC in the United States is established under the 
auspices of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, where the Coordination Office is 
located. The WDC is divided into thirteen discipline subcenters whose addresses are 
given on pages iv and v. These centers are located in institutions which, in the 
opinion of the Academy, can best serve the interests of science because of their data- 
handling capabilities for the appropriate scientific disciplines. WDC for Oceanogra- 
phy, is collocated with the National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) in Silver 
Spring, Maryland. 

After completion of the IGY program, ICSU delegated the responsibility for 
the operation of the World Data Centers to its Comite International de Geophysique 
(CIG) and subsequently to the ICSU Panel on World Data Centres. The framework 
for continued international exchange of oceanographic data is set forth in ICSU's 
Guide to the World Data Center System and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic 
Commission's (IOC's) Manual on International Oceanographic Data Exchange . 

The types of oceanographic data desired for inclusion in the World Data Cen- 
ter system are those from international cooperative expeditions, Global Change and 
Climate Research Programs, and those associated with various countries' National 
Oceanographic Programs. Data are to be exchanged internationally in accordance 
with provisions of the IOC's Manual and the ICSU Guide . Lists of National Oceano- 
graphic Programs are compiled by various national committees on oceanography 
and submitted to the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission for dissemina- 
tion to the international oceanographic community. 

Contributors of oceanographic data to the World Data Center system and 
national committees on oceanography are urged to compare the Catalogue of Data 
with data gathering cruises and expeditions listed in IOC information documents or 
on-line information systems to determine whether the cruises actually completed 
agree with those listed and to ensure that the data resulting from them are trans- 
mitted to the World Data Centers in the manner prescribed by the IOC Manual and 
the ICSU Guide . Data need not be limited to those identified in IOC documents or 
on-line systems; WDC for Oceanography, welcomes all data that fall within the 
framework of the ICSU Guide and the IOC Manual and that contributors may wish 
to include in the international marine data base of the WDCs. 



HOW TO USE THE CHANGE NOTICE TO THE CATALOGUE OF DATA 



Catalogue Numbering System 

The catalogue numbering system uses groups of numbers and letters to desig- 
nate identifying references for purposes of data archiving and retrieval. A cata- 
logue number consists of numerals for the assigned: series, country, institution, 
ship and cruise. 

Series — The catalogue numbering system is divided into basic groups called 
series. At present, these consist of the 100 series for data from ships and other 
mobile platforms and the 200 series for data from shore and fixed stations in the 
following categories: 

a. Coastal and island stations. 

b. Near shore manned stations; i.e., lightvessels and platforms. 

c. Offshore manned stations; i.e., ocean weather ships. 

d. Unmanned stations; i.e., automatic buoys. 

e. Stations on shipping routes. 

f. Offshore reference stations visited regularly. 

g. Cables in use for oceanographic observations. 

h. Repetitive drifting observations; i.e., ice islands, 
drifting buoys. 

Country — A list in the Indexes section includes all countries and institu- 
tions from which this Center has received data during this period together with 
their discrete identifying numbers. The series and two-digit country number com- 
prise the first three digits of the catalogue number. 

Example : For country number 01, Argentina, data from ships and mobile 
platforms are catalogued as 101, and data from shore and fixed stations as 201. 

NOTE: The designations of countries used in this publication do not imply 
the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of this Center 
concerning the delineation of the territorial boundaries, the political 
subdivisions, or the legal status of any country or territory. 

Institution — An institution which contributed data, either directly or 
through its designated national agency or national, regional or specialized oceano- 
graphic data center, is assigned a decimal number following the series/country 
number. 

Example : The number 101.01 is assigned to data taken by ships and mobile 
platforms and received from the Argentine Servicio de Hidrografia Naval, and the 
number 201.01 is assigned to data taken at shore and fixed stations and received 
from the same institution. 



Ship — Each ship, or in some instances a group of ships operating together, 
is assigned a letter following the series/country/institution number. The letter is 
followed by a number assigned to the particular cruise as the data are received. 

NOTE: The term "cruise" is used in this catalogue to define, whenever 
possible, the beginning and ending dates of a series of data col- 
lected by a ship, usually identified by the contributing institution 
with a cruise name and/or number. Sometimes it is necessary to 
group several series of data from one or more ships together under 
one catalogue number. 

Example : The first cruise data received from the Argentine Servicio de 
Hidrografia Naval are from the ship CAPITAN CANEPA, which is assigned the 
letter A, followed by the number 01, thus A-01; the second cruise is A-02, the third 
A-03, etc. Thus, the catalogue numbers 101.01 A-01, A-02, A-03, etc. 

A similar system is used in the 200-series for ships but is not applied to 
lightvessels and fixed shore stations; for the latter the ship/cruise identifier is 
omitted. For these categories, the series/country/institution numbers are given, 
but the lightvessel's or station's name must be added instead of the ship/cruise 
number to complete the catalogue identification. 

Example : The Canadian station at Triple Island is identified as: 206.03 
Triple Island. 

A shore station is listed under the country in or near whose territory it is 
located. If observations are carried out and the data contributed by an institution 
of another country, the observing country's name and institution are listed after 
the name of the country of location. 

How to Use the Alphabetical Index 

1. Look up the name of the ship or fixed station in the Alphabetical Index 
where the related country/institution/ship catalogue numbers are listed. 



bers. 



2. Look up, under the respective countries, the indicated Catalogue Num- 



How to Use the Geographical Index 



1. Obtain the geographic area number and name from the Geographical 
Index Charts. 

2. Look up the list of catalogue numbers of available data for the area in the 



3 



Geographical Index. 

3. Use these catalogue numbers to locate information about the types and 
amount of data available. 

How to Obtain Data from WDC for Oceanography 

When communicating with the Center for additional information concerning 
data, the requester should, where possible, refer to the specific catalogue numbers 
for data of interest. The catalogue numbers are designed to facilitate the identifi- 
cation and retrieval of the information or data you need. 

Address all correspondence to: 

Director, World Data Center for Oceanography 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adm i ti i str ation 
Silver Spring, MD 20910-3282 U.S.A. 

If you telephone, the numbers are: 

The Director: 301-713-3290. 

The Associate Director: 30 1-7 13-3295. 

The Data Archives: 301-713-3295. 

FAX: 301-713-3303 

E-mail: wdc@nodc.noaa.gov 

If you wish to visit the Center, its office hours are from 6:30 a.m. to 3:30 
p.m., Monday through Friday. The Center is not open on Saturdays, Sundays, and 
U.S. national holidays. If you wish the use of study space, you should, if possible, 
give the Center advance notice so that necessary arrangements can be made. 
There is no charge for the use of study space. 

Data Exchange Policy of World Data Center for Oceanography 

World Data Centers are held responsible for the provision of data and infor- 
mation to qualified requesters in the scientific community either in exchange or at 
a cost not to exceed that of processing and shipping. Unless a requester specifies 
otherwise, the Center is responsible for using the method which most satisfacto- 
rily reproduces the data or information item at the least cost. For certain types of 
requests, limitations in funding, personnel, or facilities may preclude direct or free 
provision of data or information by the World Data Center. 

Data exchanges between WDC for Oceanography and WDC's in the same 
discipline usually take place without charge for routine exchanges of mutually 
agreed-upon types of data received by WDC-A in internationally-approved data 



exchange formats and in readily reproducible media forms. Non-standard data types 
are not normally exchanged. The ICSU Panel has now recognized that it is not 
always economically feasible to copy large data sets from one WDC to another. For 
certain types of data, the exchange of inventories of available data in a WDC 
subcenter may be considered acceptable in lieu of the transfer of the actual data sets. 

In general, reasonably-sized requests from national or regional contributors 
to WDC for Oceanography may be considered as exchange, and equivalent data thus 
provided to the requester without charge. For requests for unusually large amounts 
of data, for specially formatted data, for derived data products, or for data to be ob- 
tained from outside the WDC system, WDC will normally be required to recover the 
costs of processing and shipping, or, at its discretion, may arrange for the request to 
be serviced by an RNODC or a regional, national, or disciplinary center. WDC may 
serve as an intermediary or coordinator for requests for unique types of data or data 
in other disciplines by placing the originator of the request in contact with the appro- 
priate institution or disciplinary center. 

Normally, WDC for Oceanography considers its data exchange commitment 
with a cooperating Data Center to be limited to the servicing of those requests or 
routine updating requirements intended to build or enhance standard data bases 
operated by that Center for specific, mutually agreed-upon data types and geographi- 
cal areas of national or scientific interest. If the availability of funding and resources 
permit, the WDC also attempts to assist such cooperating Data Centers when they 
require special data sets for institutions that are performing project-related research 
for international climate and global change programs and/or that have historically 
contributed data to WDC for Oceanography through that Data Center. WDC for 
Oceanography is obhged, in any case, to follow the exchange and cost recovery poli- 
cies of its sponsoring (funding) government agency, while attempting to maintain 
consistency with data exchange guidelines of the ICSU Panel on WDC's as pubhshed 
in the ICSU Guide . 

Data and information may be requested from WDC for Oceanography through 
NODCs, Designated National Agencies, or any other organization identified by 
national or international initiatives as responsible for communication with the World 
Data Centers. These materials may also be requested directly from WDC for Ocean- 
ography. Organizations, institutions, or individuals from Member States of the IOC 
may apply to the IOC Secretariat or UNESCO for possible assistance in funding 
their projects. 

Data Centers or institutions in the international community that have 
acquired an automated data set or specialized data product from the WDC must be 
aware that original data sets are updated from time to time, errors corrected, or 
spurious data deleted by the originating data center. Where duphcate data sets are 
deliberately held in this way, the holder is responsible for making regular contact, as 
required, with the originating center to check whether the old data set is still valid, 



whether it should be deleted, or whether new data are available. The WDC bears no 
responsibility in the conduct of these arrangements, except as regards the provision 
of information in its role as a coordination and referral center. 

Acknowledgment of Data Sources 

In many instances, data contributed to the Center are unpublished at the 
time of receipt. Unpublished data are identified in the Change Notice by the 
absence of a publication number in the column entitled Data Center Reference 
Number. Accordingly, as stipulated by the Guide, recipients of copies of such data 
from the Center are reminded that the rights of the original investigators must 
always be respected. Thus, it is requested that if any data supplied by 
WDC for Oceanography are published, due acknowledgment be made of the 
institution (and where appropriate, the principal investigator) which un- 
dertook the original observations. To facilitate proper acknowledgment, the 
Change Notice indicates the originating institution. 



PART I 

CATALOGUE INDEXES 



EXPLANATION OF THE ALPHABETICAL INDEX OF SHIPS 

AND FIXED STATIONS 

This index presents in alphabetical order the names of the ships, lightvessels, 
platforms, and shore stations that are listed on the Data Information sheets. 

Ship or Fixed Station — The name of the ship, lightvessel, platform, light- 
house, shore station, etc. Names of ships and lightvessels are given in capital let- 
ters, with lightvessels identified by (LV) after their name. All others not so identi- 
fied are shore or other types of fixed stations. 

Country — The name of the country that used the ship to collect data, or the 
name of the country in or near whose territory fixed oceanographic station observa- 
tions were made. If the data were collected by an institution of another country, the 
contributing country is listed after the one where the observations were taken. 

Catalogue Number — The country and institution numbers and ship letter 
assigned to each ship are given in this column to facilitate locating data information 
in the catalogue. 

EXPLANATION OF THE GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 

The Geographical Index is based on the divisions of areas shown on the three 
charts immediately preceding the Index. These divisions are defined in "Limits of 
Oceans and Seas," Special Publication No. 23 of the International Hydrographic 
Bureau, third edition, Monaco, 1953. To define the extensive areas of the Atlantic, 
Indian, and Pacific Oceans more specifically, the following subdivisions have been 
added: 



23 - North Atlantic Ocean 

23a - Northeast Atlantic 

23b - Northwest Atlantic 

45 - Indian Ocean 

45a - Northwest Indian 

45b - Northeast Indian 

45c - Southwest Indian 

45d - Southeast Indian 

SO - Southern Oceans 

South of latitude 50° South 



32 - South Atlantic Ocean 

32a - Southeast Atlantic 

32b - Southwest Atlantic 

57 - North Pacific Ocean 

57a - Northwest Pacific 

57b - Northeast Pacific 

61 - South Pacific Ocean 

61a - Southwest Pacific 

61b - Southeast Pacific 



The catalogue numbers of ship cruises extending into any of the areas, or 
shore or fixed stations located in the areas, are listed under the area's number and 
name. 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 


Ship or Fixed Station 


Country 


Catalogue Number 


-A- 






ALEXANDER AGASSIZ 


UNITED STATES 


139.08 H 


ALPHA HELIX 


UNITED STATES 


139.08 S 


-B- 






BUSAN 851 


KOREA 


143.02 Z 


-C- 






CHOFU MARU 


JAPAN 


124.10 D 


CHONNAM 881 


KOREA 


143.02 GG 
243.01 C 


-D- 






DAVID STARR JORDAN 


UNITED STATES 


139.23 Y 


-G- 






GYUNGBUG 885 


KOREA 


143.02 DD 
243.01 F 


-H- 






HAKUHO MARU 


JAPAN 


124.24 B 


HOKKO MARU, 


JAPAN 


124.20 A 


HOKUSEI MARU 
■ 


JAPAN 


124.02 C 


- 1 - 
INCHEON 866 


KOREA 


143.02 Y 


INCHEON 888 


KOREA 


143.02 FF 


-K- 






KAIYO MARU 


JAPAN 


124.05 E 


KEIFU MARU 


JAPAN 


124.01 F 



8 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



Ship or Fixed Station 



Country 



Catalogue Number 



KOFU MARU 
KOYO MARU 

-N- 

Neah Bay 
NEW HORIZON 

-O- 

OCA BALDA 
OSHORO MARU 



ROBERT GORDON SPROUL 
RV ALEJERO HUMBOLDT 
RYOFU MARU 



S. A. AGULHAS 
SEIFU MARU 
SHIRASE 
SHUMPU MARU 



TAMGU 3 

TANKAI MARU 
TENYO MARU 
THOMAS WASHINGTON 



JAPAN 
JAPAN 



UNITED STATES 
UNITED STATES 



ARGENTINA 
JAPAN 



UNITED STATES 

PERU 

JAPAN 



SOUTH AFRICA 
JAPAN 
JAPAN 
JAPAN 



KOREA 

JAPAN 
JAPAN 
UNITED STATES 



124.08 D 
124.16 A 



239.02 
139.08 V 



101.30 A 
124.02 B 



139.08 Z 
130.01 E 
124.01 B 



136.03 D 

124.11 D 

124.31 B 

124.09 A 



143.02 HH 

243.01 C 

124.20 A 

124.16 B 

139.08 N 



9 




10 



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y^^a^jV 


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28 A 


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28 B J 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX - DETAILS OF MEDITERRANEAN AREA 




GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX -DETAILS OF INDONESIA AREA 



11 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 


32b. 


SOUTH WEST ATLANTIC 


143.02 Z-08 
143.02 GG-03 




101.30 A-03 


143.02 HH-01 
243.01 C-28 


43. 


BAY OF BENGAL 




r 


124.24 B-65 


51 . YELLOW SEA 
143.02 Y-11 


45b. 


NORTH EAST INDIAN OCEAN 


143.02 FF-03 
143.02 GG-03 




124.16 B-19 


143.02 HH-01 




124.16 B-20 


243.01 C-28 




124.24 B-65 






124.31 B-11 


52. JAPAN SEA 


45c 


SOUTH WEST INDIAN OCEAN 


124.02 C-22 
124.08 D-84 




124.31 B-11 


124.08 D-85 




136.03 D-03 


124.10 D-89 

124.11 D-76 


45d. 


SOUTH EAST INDIAN OCEAN 


124.11 D-77 
124.16 B-19 




124.31 B-11 


124.16 B-20 
143.02 DD-05 


49. 


SOUTH CHINA SEA 


143.02 GG-03 
143.02 HH-01 




124.24 B-65 


243.01 C-28 
243.01 F-06 


50. 


EASTERN CHINA SEA 
124.01 B-94 


54. SEA OF OKHOTSK 




124.01 F-35 


124.02 C-22 




124.01 F-36 






124.10 D-88 


55. BERING SEA 




124.10 D-89 






124.16 A-38 


124.02 B-69 




124.16 A-39 


124.24 B-66 




124.16 B-19 






124.16 B-20 





12 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



56. 



PHILIPPINE SEA 



57a. 



57b. 



124.01 


B-93 


124.01 


B-94 


124.01 


F-35 


124.01 


F-36 


124.02 


B-69 


124.05 


E-01 


124.09 


A-100 


124.09 


A-101 


124.10 


D-88 


124.10 


D-89 


NORTH WEST 


PACIFIC 


124.01 


B-93 


124.01 


B-94 


124.01 


F-35 


124.01 


F-36 


124.02 


B-69 


124.02 


C-22 


124.05 


E-01 


124.08 


D-84 


124.08 


D-85 


124.20 


A-26 


124.24 


B-66 


NORTH EAST 


PACIFIC 


124.02 


B-69 


124.02 


C-22 


124.16 


A-38 


124.16 


A-39 


124.24 


B-66 


139.08 


H-18 


139.08 


H-19 


139.08 


N-22 



61a. 



61b. 



SO. 



139.08 


N-23 


139.08 


S-09 


139.08 


S-10 


139.08 


V-26 


139.08 


Z-01 


139.08 


Z-02 


139.23 


Y-39 


139.23 


Y-40 


239.02 




SOUTH WEST PACIFIC 


124.01 


B-93 


124.01 


B-94 


124.31 


B-11 


SOUTH EAST PACIFIC 


130.01 


E-03 


139.08 


H-19 


139.08 


N-21 


SOUTHERN OCEANS 


124.31 


B-11 



13 



NUMERICAL LIST OF COUNTRIES * 



1. ARGENTINA 

2. AUSTRALIA 

3. BELGIUM 

4. BRAZIL 

5. BURMA 

6. CANADA 

7. CHILE 

8. COLOMBIA 

9. DENMARK 

10. ECUADOR 

11. FINLAND 

12. TAIWAN 

13. FRANCE 

14. GERMANY 

15. GERMANY 

16. GHANA 

17. GUATEMALA 

18. ICELAND 

19. INDIA 

20. INDONESIA 

21. IRELAND 

22. ISRAEL 

23. ITALY 

24. JAPAN 

25. MEXICO 

26. NETHERLANDS 

27. NEW ZEALAND 

28. NORWAY 

29. PAKISTAN 

30. PERU 

31. PHILIPPINES 

32. POLAND 

33. PORTUGAL 

34. SPAIN 

35. SWEDEN 

36. SOUTH AFRICA 

37. RUSSIA 

38. UNITED KINGDOM 

39. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

40. URUGUAY 

42. YUGOSLAVIA 

43. KOREA (Republic of) 



44. IVORY COAST 

45. NIGERIA 

46. CONGO (People's Republic) 

47. MALAYSIA 

48. MALAGASY REPUBLIC 

49. MOROCCO 

50. SENEGAL 

51. THAILAND 

52. TURKEY 

53. VENEZUELA 

54. EL SALVADOR 

55. COSTARICA 

56. PANAMA 

57. HONDURAS 

58. DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 

59. HAITI 

60. CUBA 

61. JAMAICA 

62. AUSTRIA 

63. ROMANIA 

64. EGYPT 

65. LEBANON 

66. ALGERIA 

67. MONACO 

68. GREECE 

69. TANZANIA 

70. SIERRA LEONE 

71. TUNISIA 

72. TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO 

73. PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF 

CHINA 

74. CZECHOSLOVAKIA 

75. MAURITANIA 

76. BULGARIA 

77. BENIN 

78. PEOPLE'S DEMOCRATIC 

REPUBLIC OF YEMEN 

79. IRAQ 

80. LIBERIA 

81. SINGAPORE 

82. UKRAINE 

83. REPUBLIC OF YEMEN 



May refer to country designations during period data were received. 



14 



LIST OF DATA CENTER ACRONYMS 

AODC Australian Oceanographic Data Centre 

BODC British Oceanographic Data Centre, United Kingdom 

CEADO Centro Argentino de Datos Oceanograficos 

CECOLDO Centro Colombiano de Datos Oceanograficos 

CEDO Centro Espanol de Datos Oceanograficos 

CENADO Centro Nacional de Datos Oceanograficos, Mexico 

CENDOC Centro Nacional de Datos Oceanograficos de Chile 

CNODC China National Oceanographic Data Center 

CNRDO Centro Nazionale Raccolta Dati Oceanografici, Italy 

DOD Deutsches Ozeanographisches Datenzentrum 

ENODC Egyptian National Oceanographic Data Center 

ICES International Council for the Exploration of the Sea 

IHO International Hydrographic Organization 

INODC Indian National Oceanographic Data Center 

ISMARE Irish Marine Data Centre 

JODC Japan Oceanographic Data Center 

KODC Korean Oceanographic Data Center 

MARIS Marine Information Service, Netherlands 

MEDS Marine Environmental Data Service, Canada 

NOD Norsk Oseanografisk Datasenter 

NODC National Oceanographic Data Center, U.S.A. 

PSMSL Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level 

SADCO South African Data Centre for Oceanography 

SISMER Systeme d'Informations Scientifiques pour la Mer 



15 



INSTITUTION INDEX 


Country 


Institution 


Catalogue Number 


01 


ARGENTINA 


National Institute of Fishing and 
Development 


101.03 




24 


JAPAN 


Japan Meteorological Agency 

Hokkaido University 

Tokai Regional Fisheries Research 

Laboratory 

Hakodate Marine Observatory 

Kobe Marine Observatory 

Nagasaki Marine Observatory 

Maizuru Marine Observatory 

National Fisheries University, 

Shimonoseki 

Hokkaido Regional Fisheries Research 

Station 

Ocean Research Institute, University of 

Tokyo 

National Institute of Polar Research . . . 


124.01 
124.02 

124.05 
124.08 
124.09 
124.10 
124.11 

124.16 

124.20 

124.24 
124.31 




30 


PERU 


Instituto del Mar del Peru 


137.01 




36 


SOUTH AFRICA 


University of Cape Town 


136.03 




39 


UNITED STATES 


Scripps Institution of Oceanography . . 
National Oceanic & Atmospheric 
Administration 


139.08 
139.23 


239.02 


43 


KOREA 


National Fisheries Research & 










Development Agency 


143.02 


243.01 





16 



PART II 

WDC-A, OCEANOGRAPHY 
DATA INFORMATION 



EXPLANATION OF THE WDC FOR OCEANOGRAPHY 
DATA INFORMATION SHEET 

The Change Notice lists on Data Information sheets the data which have 
been received by this Center. The entries are described below. Countries are 
arranged in the sequence shown in the numerical list of countries. Data from 
each country are arranged in the sequence of catalogue numbers. The 200-series 
data sheets follow the last 100-series data sheet in the catalogue. 

Country / Catalogue Number — The series number and two digit number 
of the contributing country, as well as the identifying number for the data infor- 
mation, are given in this column. Details of the catalogue numbering system are 
given in the section "How to Use the Change Notice to the Catalogue of Data" . 
The numbers corresponding to the country and institution portions of the Cata- 
logue Number are found in the index section that lists countries and contribut- 
ing institutions. 

Country /Ship or Fixed Station — The country name, as well as the names 
of ships are printed in capital letters; lightvessels are identified by (LV) follow- 
ing the name. All other names not so designated are those of shore stations and 
other types of fixed platforms, such as lighthouses (LH) or offshore towers; 
names are reported as they appear with the data. 

Start Date /End Date — The dates during which the data were gathered 
are given in the order of day/month/year. In some instances, depending on the 
nature of the project, the dates indicate the beginning and ending of a cruise or 
expedition, while in others the dates indicate the first and last observations. For 
shore and fixed stations months and years only are usually given. 

Resion — The region(s) of the World Ocean where observations were 
gathered. The areas listed are defined in "Limits of Oceans and Seas," Interna- 
tional Hydrographic Bureau, Special Publication No. 23, third edition, Monaco, 
1953, with certain modifications as indicated in the Catalogue Indexes section. 

Oceanographic Serial Stations : 

Number of Stations — The number of oceanographic serial stations (also 
referred to as hydrographic, hydrographical, hydrological and hydrochemical 
stations by various authorities) at which serial measurements of temperature, 
salinity, and other chemical values are made, normally to depths of five meters 
or greater. Data to depths less than five meters are usually catalogued as Sur- 
face Observations. The single dagger symbol (f) is used to denote data obtained 
by electronic, in-situ, Salinity/Temperature/Depth (STD) or Conductivity /Tem- 
perature/ Depth (CTD) sensors. 

17 



Physical and Chemical Data — All stations as a minimum have readings of 
both temperature and salinity, unless otherwise noted. The types of physical and 
chemical data, available at serial depths as observed values, are listed using the 
following symbols and abbreviations: 

Oxy - Dissolved oxygen content 

Nutr - Nitrogen, Phosphorous, or Silicon compounds 
Pol - Heavy Metals, Hydrocarbons or other pollutants 

BT's — The type and number of mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) or 
expendable bathythermograph (XBT) observations are indicated by: 

MB - Analog prints of bathythermographs taken by a 

mechanical BT 
MTb - Tables or listings of mechanical BT temperature readings 

at selected depths 
XB - Analog prints of bathythermographs taken by an 

expendable BT 
XTb - Tables or listings of expendable BT temperature readings 

at selected depths 
DTb - Table or listings of digital BT temperature readings at 

selected depths 
STb - Tables or listings of bathythermographs reported at 

selected levels only, eg. 5m. intervals 

Currents — The types and quantity of observations of surface and subsur- 
face currents are indicated by: 

Surf - Surface 
Subs - Subsurface 

Biological — The types of marine biological observations made and the 
number of stations and/or abundance of data are indicated by any of the follow- 
ing categories: 

Phyt - Phytoplankton Pleu - Pleuston 

Pigm - Pigments Sest - Seston 

PrPr - Primary productivity Neus - Neuston 

Zoo - Zooplankton Bent - Benthos 

Nek - Nekton PeF - Pelagic fishes 

Eggs - Fish eggs and/or larvae DeF - Demersal fishes 

Micr - Microbiological data FObs - Fishery observations 

Biol - Bioluminescence Bore - Borers and foulers 

Poll - Pollution studies Cet - Cetacea 

C14 - Carbon 



18 



Surf - Surface visual observations of birds, fishes 
mammals, reptiles or discolored water 

Meteor olosical — The presence of meteorological observations taken in 
conjunction with oceanographic data is indicated. These observations may in- 
clude wind direction and speed, weather, temperature of the air, dry bulb or wet 
bulb, atmospheric pressure, clouds, visibility, humidity, dew point, precipitation, 
solar radiation, or radiosonde observations. 

Sea Surface — The types of sea surface observations and measurements 
taken are listed. In addition to the abbreviations and symbols listed for Physical 
and Chemical Data, the following are also used: 

T - Temperature of the water sample 

S - Salinity 

Col - Color of the water 

Tra - Transparency of the water 

Wa - Visual data on waves, including sea state 

IWa - Instrumented wave data 

Ice - Data on ice in the sea 

LP - Light penetration 

LPW - Long period wave records 

Data Center Reference Number — Data which have been processed at a 
national, regional, or responsible oceanographic data center, usually have been 
assigned some type of identifying reference number by that center. The availabil- 
ity of data in automated form is indicated by the initials of the data center fol- 
lowed by that center's reference number. For example, machine-processed oceano- 
graphic station data for Reference Number 310863 of the National Oceanographic 
Data Center would appear as NODC 310863. 

Publication number refers to the number from the WDC for Oceanography 
"Listing of Accessioned Data Publications" identifying the published report in which 
the referenced data appear. The absence of a number in this column indicates that 
the data were not received in published or processed form. 

Remarks — Any additional information included to further describe the 
data. The term "(CAT. OF DATA)" or "(Change)", indicates that data for this 
listed cruise represent an addition to data previously received by WDC for Oceanog- 
raphy, and already described under this Catalogue Number in the Catalogue of Data 
(including Change Notice Nos. 1-16) or the referenced Change Notice . An asterisk (*) 
is placed beside each data entry which represents an addition to data catalogued 
previously; the total number of observations held for this cruise is shown in parenthe- 
ses ( ) beneath the data entry. Data entries preceded by a minus sign (-) and enclosed 
in parentheses, e.g. (-9), indicate a deletion of observations. 



19 



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23 



WDC FOR OCEANOGRAPHY DATA INFORMATION 



The preceeding section now lists primarily those data actually received directly by 
WDC for Oceanography from its international contributors, usually in either publica- 
tions or in manuscript form. Data received in automated form from Data Centers 
(including the U.S. NODC), oceanographic institutions, or special project data centers 
are now identified and described in later sections of this Catalogue. 



LISTING OF ACCESSIONED DATA PUBLICATIONS 



WDC for Oceanography no longer publishes the yearly Supplements to the Cata- 
logue of Accessioned Publications : thus, the Center can no longer present a full 
correlation of the catalogued data with corresponding published references. The 
following Listing of Accessioned Data Publications now references by title and re- 
sponsible institution all publications received during the period that contain 
cataloguable data; it cross-references data publication information with the pertinent 
WDC Data Information Number. 



24 



LISTING OF ACCESSIONED DATA PUBLICATIONS 



WDC 
Publication Data Publication Title 

No. 



WDC Data 
Information No. 



01 ARGENTINA 

01 .07-001 "Datos CTD en una Seccion de la Platforma y Talud 1 01 .3 A-3 

Continental Argentions Entre 38-39S, Periodo 1987-991" 
(Instituto Nacional de Investigacion y Desarrollo Pesquero, 
INIDEP Informe Tecnico 3, Agosto 1994) 01.07-001 

24 JAPAN 

24.04.055 "Data Record of Oceanographic Observations and Exploratory 124.2 B-69, 
Fishing No. 42" (Hokkaido University, March 1 999) 124.2 C-22 



24.04-056 "Data Record of Oceanographic Observations and Exploratory 124.2 B-69, 
Fishing No.42 Supplement" (Hokkaido University, June 1999) 124.2 C-22 



24.06-070 Physical Data from the Hydrographic Survey on Marine 124.5 E-1 

Organism in Relation to Deep-Sea Disposal of Radioactive 
Wastes in the Central Western North Pacific Aboard R. V. 
KAIYO MARU in 1978 and 1979" (Tokai Regional Fisheries 
Research Laboratory, No. 8, December, 1 979) 

24.06-071 "General Description of Seasonal Variations in Nutrients, 124.20 A-26 

Chlorophyll a, and Netplankton Biomass along the A-line 
Transect, Western Subarctic Pacific, from 1 990 to 1 994" 
(Bulletin of the Hokkaido National Fisheries Research Institute, 
No. 62, Fisheries Agency, Hokkaido, July 1998) 

24.07-094 Data Report of Oceanographic Observations, No. 87, January - 
December, 1996 (Japan Meteorology Agency, February 1998) 



24.07-095 Data Report of Oceanographic Observations, No. 88, January - 
December, 1997 (Japan Meteorology Agency, December 1998) 



124.01 


B-93, 


124.01 


F-35, 


124.08 


D-84, 


124.09 


A-100, 


124.10 


D-88, 


124.11 


D-77 


124.01 


B-94, 


124.01 


F-36, 


124.08 


D-85, 


124.09 


A-101, 


124.10 


D-89, 


124.11 


D-76 



25 



LISTING OF ACCESSIONED DATA PUBLICATIONS 



WDC 
Publication Data Publication Title 

No. 



WDC Data 
Information No. 



24.1 1-060 Oceanographic Observations and Exploratory Fishings in the 124.16 A-38, 
East China Sea, Eastern Indian Ocean, Japan Sea, and 124.16 B-19 

Central Pacific Ocean (National Fisheries University, 
Shimonoseki, Data of Oceanographic Observations and 
Exploratory Fishings, No. 23. December 1 997) 

24.1 1-061 Oceanographic Observations and Exploratory Fishings in the 124.16 A-39, 
East China Sea, Eastern Indian Ocean, Japan Sea, and 124.16 B-20 

Central Pacific Ocean (National Fisheries University, 
Shimonoseki, Data of Oceanographic Observations and 
Exploratory Fishings, No. 24. December 1998) 

24.13-087 "Preliminary Report of the HAKUHO MARU Cruise KH-96-5 124.24 B-65 

(Piscis Austrinus Expedition) Decmber 19, 1996 - February 18, 
199, Studies on Ocean Flux in the Eastern Indian Ocean and 
its Adjacent Seas" (Ocean Research Institute, University of 
Tokyo, 1997) 

24.13-088 "Preliminary Report of the HAKUHO MARU Cruise KH-97-2, 124.24 B-66 

Subarctic North Pacific and Bering Sea Ecosystem Expedition 
(July 9 - September 8, 1997)" (Ocean Research Institute, 
University of Tokyo, 1998) 

24.22-052 Oceanographic Data of the 35th Japanese Antarctic Research 124.31 B-1 1 
Expedition from November 1993 to March 1994, JARE Data 
Reports, No.235 (Oceanography 18)" (National Institute of 
Polar Research, October 1998) 

30 PERU 

30.02-135.1 Aspectos Oceanograficos durante los Experimentos de 130.01 E-03 

Calibraciones Hidroacusticas con Anchovetas Vivas. Crucero 
BIC Humboldt 971 1 de Huacho a Pacasmayo ("Experimentos 
de Medicion de la Fuerza de Blanco de Anchoveta Empleando 
Peces Vivos; y Evaluacion Hidroacustica de Recursos 
Pelagicos. Crucero BIC Humboldt 971 1 de Huacho a 
Pacasmayo", INFORME No. 133, Instituto del Mar del Peru, 
Abril 1998) 

36 SOUTH AFRICA 

36.06-1 15 Hydrographic and Biological Data Report on the Marion Island 136.3 D-3 
Oceanographic Survey 2 (MIOS 2)" (University of Cape Town 
Oceanography Report 98-1) 



26 



LISTING OF ACCESSIONED DATA PUBLICATIONS 



WDC 
Publication Data Publication Title 

No. 



WDC Data 
Information No. 



39 UNITED STATES 

39.01-346 Data Report, Physical, Chemical, and Biological Data, 139.08 H-18 

SOUTHOW Expedition, Leg III 6-18 April 1972, Leg IV 27 139.08 N-21 

April - 14 May 1972, Leg XIII 29 January - 19 February 1973, 139.08 N-22 

CLIMAX VII Expedition, Leg II 28 August - 7 September 1773, 139.08 S-09 
Leg III 17-21 September 1973, CLIMAX VIII Expedition, 6 - 8 
December 1 973 (SIO Reference 93-1 7, 1 June 1 993) 

39.01-347 Data Report, Physical, Chemical, and Biological Data, 139.08 H-19 

TASADAY Expedition, Leg XI 24 February - 18 March 1974, 139.08 N-23 
DRAMAMINE II Expedition, 25 April - 1 8 May 1 974, KRILL 1 39.08 S-1 

Expedition, Leg I 25 May - 4 June 1974, Leg II 10-26 June 
1974, Leg III 5-21 July 1974, Leg IV 27 July - 6 August 1974, 
Leg V 1 1-19 August 1974, Leg VI 24-30 August 1974 (SIO 
Reference 98-7, 14 April 1998) 

39.01-348 Data Report, Physical, Chemical and Biological Data, CalCOFI 139.08 V-26 

Cruise 9707, 1 -1 8 July 1 997, CalCOFI Cruise 9709, 20 1 39.08 Z-01 

September - 6 October 1 997, CalCOFI Cruise 971 2, 1 3-1 6 1 39.23 Y-39 
December 1997 (SIO Reference 99-5, 16 April 1999) 

39.01-349 Data Report, Physical, Chemical and Biological Data, CalCOFI 139.08 Z-02 
Cruise 9802, 23 January - 14 February, CalCOFI Cruise 9803, 139.23 Y-40 
11-17 March 1998, CalCOFI Cruise 9804, 2-23 April, CalCOFI 
Cruise 9805, 16-22 May 1998, CalCOFI Cruise 9806, 17-23 
June 1998 (SIO Reference 99-9, 14 July 1999) 

43 KOREA 

43-02-092 Annual Report of Oceanographic Observations for 1998 143.2 DD-5, 

(National Fisheries Research and Development Agency, 143.2 FF-3, 

Volume 47, October 1 999) 1 43.2 HH-1 , 

143.2 GG-3, 

143.2 Z-8, 

143.2 Y-11, 

243.1 C-28, 

243.1 F-6 



27 



PART III 

INTERNATIONAL DATA ACQUISITION 

AND EXCHANGE 



THE INTERNATIONAL MARINE 

DATA BASE 



International Data Acquisition and Exchange 



For the 40-year period since its inception during the International Geophysical 
Year (IGY), WDC for Oceanography has provided comprehensive tabulations of its 
yearly accessions and cumulative holdings as a reference standard by which the 
relative success of international oceanographic data exchange thru the WDC 
system (under both ICSU and IOC/IODE guidelines) can be measured. It has 
become increasingly apparent during recent years, however, that in order to main- 
tain consistency and continuity in this process, the WDC must significantly modify 
its traditional approach to take into account changing conditions. The advent of data 
acquisition programs, such as the Global Data Archaeology and Rescue (GODAR) 
Project, combined with enhanced cap abilities to utilize CD-ROM technology and 
electronic data transmission for the rapid exchange of large data sets, have resulted 
in a major infusion of data into WDC data bases. 

A problem resulting from this obvious success story has been the difficulty that the 
WDC has experienced in attempting to catalogue and tabulate these massive data 
sets, using standard (traditional) cataloguing procedures. Additionally, the sheer 
magnitude of many of these data sets (which may contain historical observations 
taken over many years) often tends to overshadow the all-important yearly data 
accessions from WDC's regular contributors. To address these problems, the WDC 
has evaluated its most recent yearly data accessions with a view toward the need to 
give proper recognition to its regular contributors, while at the same time attempting 
to provide somewhat more detail with regard to data sets received through programs 
such as GODAR. 

Through this process, the following general categories have been identified as repre- 
senting major components of the WDC's International Marine Data Base (Figure 1): 

1. Regular accessions from WDC contributors representing observations that can 
be catalogued using standard (traditional) cataloguing procedures (Tables 1-4); 

2. Historical data received under the aegis of the GODAR Program (Tables 5-7); 

3. Data received in digital form through the co-located U.S. National Oceano- 
graphic Data Center (NODC) (Tables 8-11). 

The International Marine Data Base of WDC for Oceanography, then, as depicted in 
Figure 1, now comprises the Center's total data holdings - that is, it summarizes data 
holdings from all three categories. Category 1 is denned as the material already 
identified and described in Part II of this Catalogue; explanations are fur-ther ex- 
panded upon on Page 30. Brief descriptions follow for Categories 2 and 3. 



29 



Global Data Archaeology and Rescue (GODAR) Project 

The goal of the GODAR program is to augment the historical digital oceanographic data 
archives by seeking out and recovering manuscript and digital ocean data not yet 
includedin the digital ocean databases accessible to the world research community. The 
term Data Archaeology andRescue describes the two-part process of first identifying and 
locating the data, and then performing the necessary steps to merge them into a digital 
database. The enhanced historical ocean data archives resultingfrom this Project have 
led to improved ocean climatologies and have also supported more complete studies of 
ocean variability. The following activities are undertaken as a part of the GODAR 
process: 

— prepare inventories of data available only in manuscript or other analog form, 
as well as data not currently available in digital form at a national or World 
Data Center; 

— digitize data that now exist only in manuscript or other analog form; 

— ensure that all oceanographic data available for international exchange are 
archived in digital form; 

— perform Quality Control on all data; 

— make all data readily accessible to the international community. 

The WDC has very substantially augmented its data bases through numerous GODAR 
contributions during recent years. Such contributions do not reflect, however, the total 
benefit derived from GODAR; many digitally-received GODAR contributions, that did 
not represent data "new" to WDC , were of equal importance because they represented 
data sets previously receivedby the WDCs in manuscript form only, as well as "rescued" 
data that had been held by originators on magnetic media that were susceptible to loss 
by degradation. 

The basic premise of GODAR seems to engender a spirit of cooperation; many countries 
have contributed data that had previously been unavailable for international ex- 
change. GODAR has also presented an excellent opportunity for developing countries 
to become more intimately involved with the IODE data management process. GODAR 
has provided a mechanism with the implementation of Regional Workshops, through 
which developing countries can facilitate the processing, exchange, and preservation of 
oceanographic data. 

Data Received in Digital Form through NODC 

The WDC benefits significantly from its co-location with the U.S. National Oceano- 
graphic Data Center (NODC). In addition to providing automated data management 
services in support of the WDC, the NODC is an excellent source of oceanographic data 
in digital form for national, as well as international, data-gathering programs. Over the 
years, NODC has been a Special Project Data Center for numerous international 
cooperative investigations; this has led to the ready availability to the WDC of many 
important international data sets in digital form. 

30 




Current Data 

703,155 obs. 

(11.3%) 



Other 
25,329 obs. 

(■4%) 



Biological Data 

487,175 obs. 

(7.9%) 



Total: 6,217,696 obs. 



Figure 1. International Marine Data Base of WDC for Oceanography 



31 



WDC for Oceanography Data Base* Summaries 



Oceanographic Station Data Base 

Table 1 (page 31) summarizes the 1,357,813 oceanographic serial stations 
received by nation under which these data are catalogued. Nations from which no 
station data have been received are not listed, although in some cases publications 
or other types of data may have been received. 



Bathythermograph Data Base 

Table 2 (page 33) summarizes the number of bathythermograph observa- 
tions received from the nation under which the data are catalogued. The number of 
cruises on which the data were observed is also listed. A total of 604,434 bathyther- 
mograph observations were taken during 9,350 cruises, which includes 1,430 obser- 
vations received in 1999. 



Biological Data Base 

Table 3 (page 34) shows, by nation, the number of biological observations 
received by this Center since its inception and includes 4,395 observations received 
in 1999. A total of 177,800 observations, including plankton observations, primary 
productivity measurements, pigment concentration measurements, carbon- 14 mea- 
surements, and fishery observations, have been taken during 2,292 cruises. 



Surface and Subsurface Current Data Base 

Table 4 (page 35) summarizes, by nation, the number of surface and 
subsurface current measurements received by this Center since its inception. The 
total of 703,152 current measurements includes 118,640 subsurface and 584,510 
surface measurements taken during 4,304 cruises. A total of 5,044 new current 
measurements were added in 1999. 



* Tabulations for these Data Bases (Tables 1 - 4) include cumulative historical and 
contemporary accessions of data from regular exchanges with WDC contributors, 
and represent only observations that could be catalogued using standard catalogu- 
ing procedures. Recent data accessions from the GODAR Program and of digital 
data sets from NODC are not included in Tables 1-4. 



32 



Oceanographic Station Data Base 



Table 1. — Number of oceanographic serial stations received by WDC for Oceanography, 
from various nations 





Stations Received 


Total Stations 


Total Stations 


Nation 


in 1999 


on Hand 


on Hand 






prior to 1999 


at end of 1999 


1. Argentina 


130 


2,833 


2,963 


2. Australia 


~ 


19,256 


19,256 


3. Belgium 


~ 


4,941 


4,941 


4. Brazil 


- 


7,496 


7,496 


6. Canada 


— 


75,904 


75,904 


7. Chile 


~ 


1,048 


1,048 


8. Colombia 


~ 


1,267 


1,267 


9. Denmark 


— 


40,701 


40,701 


10. Ecuador 


- 


2,234 


2,234 


11. Finland 


- 


39,194 


39,194 


12. Taiwan 


- 


693 


693 


13. France 


~ 


23,399 


23,399 


14. Germany 


- 


68,415 


68,415 


16. Ghana 


— 


2,772 


2,772 


18. Iceland 


— 


10,567 


10,567 


19. India 


— 


2,094 


2,094 


20. Indonesia 


- 


2,352 


2,352 


21. Ireland 


— 


2,553 


2,553 


22. Israel 


- 


2,410 


2,410 


23. Italy 


- 


4,160 


4,160 


24. Japan 


3,675 


418,964 


422,639 


25. Mexico 


- 


1,517 


1,517 


26. Netherlands 


- 


10,377 


10,377 


27. New Zealand 


~ 


1,941 


1,941 


28. Norway 


- 


40,152 


40,152 


29. Pakistan 


- 


174 


174 


30. Peru 


50 


4,016 


4,066 


31. Philippines 


- 


199 


199 



(continued) 



33 



Oceanographic Station Data Base 

Table 1. — Number of oceanographic serial stations received by WDC for Oceanography, 
from various nations (continued) 





Stations Received 


Total Stations 


Total Stations 


Nation 


in 1999 


on Hand 


on Hand 






prior to 1999 


at end of 1999 


32. Poland 


.. 


9,174 


9,174 


33. Portugal 


— 


3,959 


3,959 


34. Spain 


~ 


1,931 


1,931 


35. Sweden 


~ 


56,975 


56,975 


36. South Africa 


57 


16,046 


16,103 


37. Russia 


— 


109,530 


109,530 


38. United Kingdom 


~ 


51,911 


51,911 


39. United States 


767 


223,581 


224,348 


42. Yugoslavia 


— 


8,292 


8,292 


43. Korea 


1,293 


48,522 


49,815 


44. Ivory Coast 


— 


4,196 


4,196 


45. Nigeria 


~ 


997 


997 


46. Congo (P. Rep.) 


~ 


5,302 


5,302 


47. Malaysia 


— 


150 


150 


48. Malagasy Republic 


— 


1,311 


1,311 


49. Morocco 


— 


9 


9 


50. Senegal 


— 


1,795 


1,795 


51. Thailand 


— 


2,311 


2,311 


52. Turkey 


— 


637 


637 


53. Venezuela 


— 


2,184 


2,184 


60. Cuba 


~ 


812 


812 


63. Romania 


— 


355 


355 


64. Egypt 


~ 


308 


308 


68. Greece 


— 


217 


217 


71. Tunisia 


~ 


157 


157 


73. China (P. Rep.) 


~ 


9,139 


9,139 


75. Mauritania 


— 


411 


411 


Totals 


5,972 


1,351,841 


1,357,813 



34 



Bathythermograph Data Base 

Table 2. -- Number of bathythermograph observations received by WDC for 
Oceanography, from various nations thru 1999 





No. of 
cruises 


Tvpe of data format 




Nation 


Mechanical BT 


Expendable BT 


Total 




Analog 


Tabular 


Analog 


Tabular 




1. Argentina 


79 


4,050 


3,688 


-- 


603 


8,341 


2. Australia 


683 


-- 


9,460 


1 


28,234 


37,695 


3. Belgium 


2 


-- 


15 


-- 


-- 


15 


4. Brazil 


7 


43 


85 


-- 


485 


613 


6. Canada 


1,678 


21,248 


469 


-- 


44,627 


66,344 


7. Chile 


8 


846 


-- 


-- 


165 


1,011 


8. Colombia 


2 


316 


-- 


-- 


-- 


316 


9. Denmark 


2 


70 


-- 


-- 


-- 


70 


10. Ecuador 


11 


-- 


-- 


-- 


405 


405 


11. Finland 


2 


124 


168 


-- 


-- 


292 


13. France 


169 


352 


-- 


-- 


8,480 


8,832 


14. Germany 


395 


59 


14,258 


-- 


19,537 


33,854 


16. Ghana 


1 


12 


-- 


-- 


-• 


12 


18. Iceland 


50 


124 


7,075 


-- 


-- 


7,199 


19. India 


2 


-- 


351 


-- 


522 


873 


20. Indonesia 


13 


162 


118 


-- 


-- 


280 


23. Italy 


24 


879 


561 


72 


282 


1,794 


24. Japan 


3,461 


-- 


166,878 


-- 


60,995 


227,873 


25. Mexico 


23 


-- 


-- 


-- 


378 


378 


26. Netherlands 


67 


675 


-- 


-- 


3,942 


4,617 


27. New Zealand 


21 


-- 


-- 


-- 


1,108 


1,108 


28. Norway 


14 


82 


158 


-- 


462 


702 


29. Pakistan 


2 


-- 


65 


-- 


-- 


65 


30. Peru 


31 


-- 


-- 


-- 


970 


970 


31. Philippines 


1 


-- 


-- 


-- 


8 


8 


32. Poland 


7 


-- 


153 


-- 


279 


432 


33. Portugal 


24 


448 


2,725 


12 


194 


3,379 


34. Spain 


6 


194 


-- 


-- 


225 


419 


35. Sweden 


6 


10 j 


57 


-- 


612 


679 


36. South Africa 


3 


-- 


-- 


-- 


243 


243 


37. Russia 


115 


428 


12,395 


-- 


5,388 


18,211 


38. United Kingdom 


1,380 


276 


44,973 


-- 


17,844 


63,093 


39. United States 


942 


36,114 


3,489 


646 


59,997 


100.246 


43. Korea (Rep. of) 


28 


-- 


1,427 


-- 


276 


1,703 


44. Ivory Coast 


6 


618 


-- 


-• 


-- 


618 


45. Nigeria 


6 


1,011 


20 


-- 


-- 


1,031 


46. Congo (P. Rep.) 


21 


2,389 


83 


-- 


-- 


2,472 


48. Malagasy Rep. 


10 


476 


-- 


-- 


-- 


476 


50. Senegal 


8 


730 


-- 


• - 


-- 


730 


70. Sierra Leone 


2 


194 


-- 


-- 


-- 


194 


71. Tunisia 


1 


-- 


121 


-- 


-- 


121 


73. China (P. Rep.) 


7 


-- 


-- 


-- 


620 


620 


99. Ships of Opportunity 


30 


-- 


-- 


-- 


6,100 


6.100 


Total 


9,350 


71.930 


268.792 


731 


262.981 


604.434 



35 



Biological Data Base 

Table 3. -- Number of biological observations received by WDC for 
Oceanography from various nations thru 1999 





No. of 


Type of observation 


Nation 




Primary 










cruises 


Plankton 


Productivity 


Pigments 


C-14 


Fishery 


1. Argentina 


13 


452 


47 


233 


129 




2. Australia 


64 


1,527 


1,599 


1,738 


— 


2,666 


4. Brazil 


16 


754 


— 


175 


— 


36 


6. Canada 


58 


1,342 


669 


1,303 


47 


100 


8. Colombia 


7 


181 


— 


496 


— 


— 


10. Ecuador 


3 


895 


191 


116 


— 


— 


12. Taiwan 


3 


98 


— 


98 


— 


15 


13. France 


28 


720 


288 


510 


43 


92 


14. Germany 


26 


594 


238 


2,901 


1,552 


731 


19. India 


12 


424 


— 


— 


— 


— 


20. Indonesia 


61 


2,004 


5 


702 


— 


7 


22. Israel 


1 


58 


— 


— 


— 


— 


23. Italy 


1 


18 


18 


18 


— 


— 


24. Japan 


1340 


44,559 


180 


25,899 


30 


8,129 


25. Mexico 


14 


111 


13 


404 


— 


— 


26. Netherlands 


2 


150 


24 


36 


— 


— 


27. New Zealand 


1 


46 


— 


69 


71 


— 


29. Pakistan 


1 


14 


— 


— 


— 


— 


30. Peru 


7 


517 


3 


27 


10 


12 


32. Poland 


1 


— 


— 


81 


— 


— 


33. Portugal 


5 


351 


— 


128 


— 


57 


34. Spain 


7 


66 


87 


175 


— 


27 


35. Sweden 


1 \ 


— 


18 


— 


— 


— 


36. South Africa 


23 


985 


165 


536 


— 


— 


37. Russia 


12 


3,837 


743 


262 


— 


389 


38. United Kingdom 


6 


416 


— 


99 


— 


— 


39. United States 


335 


12,381 


5,962 


14,350 


745 


4,445 


42. Yugoslavia 


1 


167 


— 


— 


— 


— 


43. Korea (Rep. of) 


193 


21,282 


— 


— ■ 


— 


— 


44. Ivory Coast 


3 


27 


7 


— 


— 


1 


45. Nigeria 


6 


5 


4 


— 


— 


2,018 


46. Congo (P. Rep.) 


4 


24 


93 


70 


— 


1 


48. Malagasy Rep. 


9 


84 


54 


54 


— 


— 


50. Senegal 


11 


34 


— 


477 


— 


258 


60. Cuba 


1 


— 


37 


— 


— 


— 


63. Romania 


10 


261 


— 


— 


— 


— 


64. ArabRep.ofEgypt2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


188 




71. Greece 


1 


3 


4 


— 


— 


— 


73. China (P. Rep.) 


2 


— 


68 


139 


— 


— 


75. Mauritania 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Total 


2,292 


94,387 


10,517 


51,096 


2,627 


19,173 



36 



Surface and Subsurface Current Data Base 



Table 4. -- Number of surface and subsurface current measurements received 
by WDC for Oceanography from various nations thru 1999 





Nation 


No. of 
cruises 


Subsurface 


Surface 


2. 


Australia 


50 


1,663 




4. 


Brazil 


1 


83 


— 


6. 


Canada 


21 


1,558 


1,052 


9. 


Denmark 


62 


— 


20,184 


10. 


Ecuador 


1 


46 


9 


11. 


Finland 


6 


5,472 


5708 


13. 


France 


20 


6,450 


632 


14. 


Germany 


115 


10,794 


327,348 


20. 


Indonesia 


13 


177 


40 


23. 


Italy 


2 


782 


— 


24. 


Japan 


3,688 


23,346 


191,036 


25. 


Mexico 


6 


— 


6,816 


26. 


Netherlands 


21 


10,242 


— 


28. 


Norway 


6 


2,691 


86 


32. 


Poland 


2 


291 


— 


33. 


Portugal 


4 


74 


— 


35. 


Sweden 


116 


22,751 


24,237 


37. 


Russia 


49 


20,660 


1,510 


38. 


United Kingdom 


9 


799 


258 


39. 


United States 


58 


4,493 


4,940 


42. 


Yugoslavia 


25 


603 


149 


43. 


Korea (Rep. of) 


2 


— 


284 


44. 


Ivory Coast i 


3 


44 


140 


46. 


Congo (P. Rep.) 


3 


218 


— 


48. 


Malagasy Rep. 


1 


24 


24 


52. 


Turkey 


1 


5,095 


40 


63. 


Romania 


19 


284 


17 


Total 


4,304 


118,640 


584,510 



37 



Table 5. Oceanographic station data received through GODAR, 1999 



NATION 


DATA SET 


NO. OF STATIONS 


Australia 


Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research 
Organization, R/V FRANKLIN 


4,294 


France 


Institut Francais de Recherche pour l'Exploitation de la 
Mer (IFREMER), Multiple projects 1986-1998 


4,597 


France 


IFREMER, Mediterranean Sea and Bay of Biscay 


976 


France 


Mediterranean Hydrological Atlas 


50,695 


Germany 


Institut fur Hochseefischerie, West African Coast 


2,867 


Germany 


Bundesamt fur Seeschiffahrt und Hydrographie, 
1973-1999 


16,171 


ICES 


Multiple projects 1977-1998 


20,888 


India 


ORV SAGAR KANYA, Arabian Sea JGOFS Cruises 


142 


Russia 


Russian State Hydrometeorological University, NE 
Atlantic and Baltic Sea Fisheries Oceanography 


777 


Russia 


Ukrainian Scientific Centre of the Ecology of Sea 
(UkrSCES) 


2,142 


Russia 


Pacific Oceanographic Institute, POI-97, 1969-1995 


9,315 


Russia 


Ukrainian Scientific Centre of the Ecology of Sea 
(UkrSCES) 


324 


Russia 


MEGAPOLYGON-87 


1,843 


Russia 


Polar Marine Geological Research Expedition 
(PMGRE) 1987-1998 


94 


Russia 


Murmansk Marine Biologcal Institute, 

White, Barents and Norwegian Seas, 1952-1992 


1,621 


Ukraine 


UkrSCES, North Atlantic Sections 


4,330 


Ukraine 


Ukranian Scientific Centre of the Ecology of the Sea, 
North East Atlantic, 1972-1991 


2,996 


Ukraine 


Newfoundland Energetic Activity Polygon (NEAZO) 


4,022 


United States 


ICES Hydrographie Office 1914-1991 


12,355 



38 



Table 6. Bathythermograph observations received through GOD AR, 1999 



NATION 


DATA SET 


NO. OF OBS. 


Australia 


R/V FRANKLIN, cruises in the Indian and Pacific 
Oceans 


275 


France 


Mediterranean Hydrological Atlas 


12,000 * 


Germany 


Bundesamt fur Seeschiffahrt und Hydrographie 


6,867 


India 


ORV SAGAR KANYA, Arabian Sea JGOFS Cruises 


49 


Russia 


YUGniro MBTs 


11,830 



This number represents observations that are new to the WDC Marine Data Base 



Table 7. Biological observations received through GODAR, 1999 



NATION 


DATA SET 


NO. OF OBS. 


India 


ORV SAGAR KANYA, Arabian Sea JGOFS Cruises 
Zooplankton and Chlorophyll 


118 


United States 


SeaBAM, 1961-1996 Pigment data 


17,300 


Russia 


Murmansk Marine Biology Institute, 1958 White Sea 
Zooplankton 


853 


Russia 


Pacific Oceanographic Institute, Pacific Ocean 
primary productivity 


465 



39 



Table 8. Oceanographic station data received through NODC, 1999 



NATION 


DATA SET 


NO. OF 
STATIONS 


Canada 


Bedford Institute of Oceanography, GLOBEC - 
Georges Bank 


266 


United States 


ARLftNDO Circulation 


69 


United States 


Acid Rain Project, NOAA/PMEL 


126 


United States 


Bering Sea - DENSE WATER (NSF) 


67 


United States 


Bering Sea Circulation 


337 


United States 


Bering Sea, Aleutian Shelf - Coordinated Investigations 


894 


United States 


Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska - Outer Continental Shelf 
Environmental Assessment Project 


293 


United States 


Bering Sea, Marginal Ice Zone Experiment 


166 


United States 


CUEA, Oregon Coast 


522 


United States 


Carbon Dioxide Project 


207 


United States 


GLOBEC - Broad Scale Hydrography, Gulf of Maine 


681 


United States 


GLOBEC - California Coasts 


265 


United States 


GLOBEC - Georges Bank 


1,248 


United States 


GLOBEC - Gulf of Alaska 


353 


United States 


Global Ocean- Atmosphere-Land Syste/Pan American 
Climate Studies (GOALS/PACS) 


486 


United States 


Gulf Stream Studies 


222 


United States 


Gulf of Maine Regional Marine Research Program 


97 


United States 


Gulf of Maine, Open Ocean Aquaculture (OOAQ) 


82 


United States 


Hawaii - Generating Station Time Series 


2,190 


United States 


Hawaiin Ocean Time Series 


3,836 


United States 


JGOFS - Arabian Sea 


79 


United States 


JGOFS - Southern Ocean Project 


260 


United States 


JGOFS Antarctic Environment and Southern Ocean 
Process Study 


601 


United States 


NOAA Ships - RUDE, WHITING Cruises 


341 


United States 


Mamala Bay Study 


10 



(continued) 



40 



Table 8. Oceanographic station data received through NODC, 1999 (continued) 



NATION 


DATA SET 


NO. OF 
STATIONS 


United States 


Marine Ecosystems Analysis Project - Puget Sound 


930 


United States 


Massachusetts Bay Project 


681 


United States 


Mesoscale Circulation Study 


653 


United States 


MOODS data set update 


4,217 


United States 


Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary 


291 


United States 


OACES/ACCP 


130 


United States 


Ocean Color Satellite Sensors - U.S. Coasts 


593 


United States 


Ocean-Atmosphere Carbon Exchange Study 


643 


United States 


Routine Fisheries Monitoring, NOAA/NMFS 


1,850 


United States 


R/V OCEANUS Cruise 256 Leg 1 


27 


United States 


Southern California Bight Study 


268 


United States 


Yaquina Bay Seawater Database 


98,298 


United States/ 


US-PRC Cooperative Investigations 


717 


P. Rep. of China 






United States/ 


Joint US/USSR Chukchi Sea Circulation Study 


337 


Russia 







41 



Table 9. Bathythermograph observations received through NODC, 1999 



NATION 


DATA SET 


NO. OF OBS. 


Australia 


Bureau of Meteorology, Indian and Pacific Oceans 


1,332 


Australia 


AODC, Indian and Pacific Oceans (1998) 


1,693 


Australia 


CSIRO, Indian Ocean (1995-1996) 


44 


Australia 


CSIRO, Indian and Pacific Oceans (1998) 


990 


Germany 


Bundesamt fur Seeschiffahrt und Hydrographie 
(BSH), Atlantic Ocean, WOCE 


979 


Japan 


Japan National Research Institute of Far East Fisheries, 
Indian Ocean, WOCE 


234 


United States 


Scripps Institution of Oceanography, High Resolution 
XBT Network 


896 


United States 


NOAA PMEL, Acid Rain Project 


4 


United States 


NOAA PMEL, Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Study 
(EPOCS) 


217 


United States 


University of Hawaii, Hawaiian Ocean Time Series 
(1989-1991) 


217 


United States 


Shipboard Environmental Data Acquisition System 
(SEAS), Ships of Opportunity Program 


16,454 


United States 


MOODS data set update 


3,150 



42 



Table 10. Current Meter data sets received through NODC, 1999 



NATION 


DATA SET 


PERIOD 


Canada 


GLOBEC - Georges Bank and Scotian Shelf 


Oct 1993 - Sep 1996 


Canada 


RNODC Drifting Buoy 


Jan - Dec 1998 


Japan 


Western Pacific, Japan Sea and Eas China Sea, 
Moored Buoy 


Jan - Dec 1997 


United States 


Bering and Chukchi Seas 


Sep 1981 -Jul 1983 


United States 


Boca de Quadra (BORAX) 


Jul - Sep 1982 


United States 


Circulation - North Central Chukchi Sea Shelf 


Sep 1991 - Sep 1996 


United States 


EXXON VALDEZ Oil Spill Restoration 


Apr - Nov 1989 


United States 


GLOBEC - Georges Bank, Drifting Buoys 


Apr 1997 - May 1998 


United States 


Gulf of Alaska JET Experiment 


Apr 1983 - Oct 1984 


United States 


Gulf of Alaska Recirculation Study 


Nov 1986 - Sep 1988 


United States 


Gulf of Alaska Resurrection Bay 


Mar - May 1979 


United States 


Gulf of Alaska Trans-Alaska Pipeline System 


Jun - Oct 1989 


United States 


Hawaiian Ocean Time Series 


Apr 1998 - May 1999 


United States 


JGOFS Southern Ocean Project, Drifting Buoys 
and Current Meters 


Dec 1994 - Jun 1998 


United States 


Marginal Ice Zone Experiment and Chukchi Sea 
Circulation Study, Drifting Buoys 


Feb 1986 - Jun 1991 


United States 


TOGA/TAO Moorings, Equatorial Pacific 


Mar 1991 - Jun 1996 


United States 


U. S. Coasts 


May 1975 - Jun 1988 


United States 


Western Gulf of Mexico, Drifting Buoy 


Apr 1999 



43 



Table 11. Biological observations received through NODC, 1999 



NATION 


DATA SET 


NO. OF OBS. 


United States 


Coral Reefs ; Maui, University of Hawaii 


926 surveys 


United States 


Coral Reefs ; Maui, University of Hawaii 


50 transects 


United States 


Coral Reefs; American Samoa Coastal 
Resources Inventory 


13 sites 


United States 


Crustacea; Mamala Bay, University of Hawaii 


9 stations 


United States 


Primary production; Ross Sea, JGOFS Antarctic 
Environment and Southern Ocean Process Study 


78 casts 


United States 


N15 Uptake; Ross Sea, JGOFS Antarctic 

Environment and Southern Ocean Process Study 


10 casts 


United States 


Time-Series Station Cariaco, Venezuela 


6 casts 


United States 


Plankton, Ross Sea, JGOFS Antarctic Environment 
and Southern Ocean Process Study 


59 casts 


United States 


THOMAS THOMPSON, Arabian Sea JGOFS 
Cruise 


141 casts 


United States 


Mamala Bay Benthos Study 


25 stations 



44 





























Number of Oceanographic Stations 

Received at the WDC by Year 






















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Number of Bathythermographs 

Received at the WDC by Year 
















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46 



PART IV 

DATA HOLDINGS OF 

RNODC's AND 

SPECIALIZED DATA CENTERS 



DATA HOLDINGS of 
RNODC's and SPECIALIZED DATA CENTERS 



This section of the Change Notice provides information on the availability of 
specialized data sets prepared by the various Responsible National Oceanographic 
Data Centers (RNODC's) and other Specialized Data Centers. Normally, only those 
data sets that have actually been received by WDC-A, Oceanography are described 
in this section; WDC-A can provide digital copies of these data sets either in the 
originator's format or in the prescribed international exchange format. 

These data products are not described in the usual manner in the Catalogue 
portion of the Change Notice (except for certain separately -identified cruises that 
are also included in data sets such as FOY), as the data are not always merged with 
the standard WDC-A, Oceanography data bases. Thus they constitute a suite of 
data products, prepared by RNODC's and other Specialized Data Centers, that are 
separate and distinct from the standard data types regularly catalogued in the 
Change Notices and normally available from WDC-A. 

Such data products are not necessarily intended to be routinely exchanged by 
the WDC's under normal international data exchange guidelines. They may be 
voluminous or costly to prepare and, thus, may be precluded from regular data 
exchanges between WDC's and their exchange cooperators. Data sets in automated 
form are available from the WDC's usually at a cost not to exceed the cost of 
reproduction and postage. 



MEDALPEX 





iS^JSP. 



47 




RNODC FOY 



FGGE OPERATIONAL YEAR 
GLOBAL OCEAN CLIMATE DATA BASE 



The Global Ocean Climate Data Base is avail- 
able from the National Oceanographic Data 
Center (NODC) which served as the Responsible 
National Oceanographic Data Center for the 
FGGE* Operational Year (RNODC/FOY). The 
Global Ocean Climate Data Base is a collection 
of oceangraphic data submitted to NODC by 17 
different countries. Although the formal FGGE 
Operational Year was from 1 December 1978 to 
30 November 1979, the data set covers the 
extended FOY period from 1 September 1978 to 
29 February 1980. 

The data base includes four types of data: (1) 
oceanographic hydrocast (bottle) data, (2) con- 
ductivity/ salinity-temperature-depth (C/STD) 
data, (3) expendable bathythermograph (XBT) 



*FGGE = First GARP Global Experiment, also 
known as the Global Weather Experiment. 
GARP = Global Atmosphere Research Program. 



data, and (4) Eulerian currrent (current meter) 
data. The data are recorded on magnetic tape in 
two different formats: (1) the Intergovernmental 
Oceanographic Commission General Exchange 
Format 3 (GF3) and (2) NODC archive formats 
(different format for each of the four types of 
data). In GF3 the data base comprises eight 
magnetic tapes; in the NODC formats the data 
base comprises four tapes. 

The FGGE Operational Year was the culmina- 
tion of a series of international ocean/atmos- 
phere research programs conducted in the 
1970's. This effort, in turn, was a steppingstone 
toward the increasingly ambitious and large- 
scale research and monitoring programs of the 
1980's and 1990's that are directed toward fuller 
understanding of tropical dynamics and their 
influence on global ocean/atmosphere phenom- 
ena. 




48 



The FGGE/FOY Data Base 



The FGGE/FOY Global Ocean Climate Data Base temperature profiles; and 294 months of time- 
compiled by the RNODC contains: 10,413 Oceano- series data from current meter moorings. The 
graphic hydrocast (bottle) stations; 4,030 CTD/STD sources of these data are summarized in Table 1. 
casts; 28,733 expendable bathythermograph (XBT) 



Table 1. 


FGGE Operational Year Global Ocean Climate Data Base 


Country 




Data Type 




Oceanographic 
Stations 
(stations) 


CTD/STD 
(stations) 


XBT 

(stations) 


Current 

Meter 

(meter-months) 


Australia 


- 


- 


2,754 


- 


Canada 


324 


- 


507 


- 


People's Republic 
of China 


318 


-- 


-- 


■- 


Republic of the 
Congo 


307 


- 


-- 


- 


France 


-- 


-- 


307 


~ 


German Democratic 
Republic 


74 


- 


- 


■■ 


Federal Republic 
of Germany 


-- 


- 


1,366 


•• 


Ghana 


335 


- 


-- 


- 


Italy 


-- 


-- 


55 


- 


Japan 


1,138 


-- 


832 


-- 


Philippines 


-- 


-- 


8 


-- 


Poland 


87 


- 


267 


-- 


Republic of 
South Africa 


-- 


-- 


56 


-- 


Spain 


- 


-- 


180 


- 


UK 


-- 


64 


944 


-- 


USA 


1,271 


3,966 


20,727 


294 


USSR 


6,559 


•- 


730 


-- 


TOTAL 


10,413 


4,030 


28,733 


294 



49 



Table 2 lists the number of tapes included in the tapes or only the tape(s) for one or more of the 
data set. Customers may order the entire set of four different data types in either of the two 

format options. 



Table 2. 


FOY Global Ocean Climate Data Tapes 










Number of Tapes 


Data Type 




Data Quantity 


GF3 Format 
(1600 bpi) 


NODC Format 
(6250 bpi) 


Oceanographic Station 
(hydrocast) 


10,413 stations 
(128 cruises) 


2 


1 


CTD/STD 




4,030 stations 
(62 cruises) 


1 


1 


XBT 




28,733 stations 
(571 cruises) 


3 


1 


Current Meter 




294 months 
(27 meters) 


2 


1 






TOTAL 


8 


4 



Data Availability 



Copies of the FOY Global Ocean Climate Data Set are available from the RNODC as ASCII files on 
floppy disk or via FTP over the internet: 

World Data Center A, Oceanography 

NOAA 

Silver Spring, MD 20910-3282, USA 

Telephone: 301-713-3295 

FAX: 301-713-3303 

E-mail: wdca@nodc.noaa.gov 



50 



RNODC MEDALPEX (Sea Level) 



MEDITERRANEAN ALPINE EXPERIMENT 
SEA LEVEL DATA SET 



In 1975, the IOC decided to support the development of an oceanographic program 
in the Mediterranean during the GAKP Alpine Experiment (ALPEX). The 
MEDALPEX project took place between 1 September 1981 and 30 September 1982, 
with a special period of observation from 15 February 1982 to 30 April 1982. It was 
a multi-national project involving scientists from 7 countries. 

The main purpose of MEDALPEX was to increase understanding of the effect of 
wind forcing on the dynamics of the western part of the Mediterranean Basin. 
Specific studies were undertaken, each having a particular scientific objective in- 
cluding: 

1. The interrelationship between the general circulation 
and mesoscale eddies 

2. Offshore dynamic response mechanisms under severe 
weather conditions 

3. Storm surges and the piling up of water, especially 
in the Adriatic and Ligurian seas 

The measurement of sea level was considered to be an important component of the 
observation program to support these studies. A wide range of other types of 
oceanographic data were also collected, including classical and synoptic meteorologi- 
cal measurements, data collected using remote sensing techniques and data from 
current meters, thermistor chains, waverider buoys, CTDs and XBTs. 

The Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) was requested by IOC to fulfil 
the role of the Responsible National Oceanographic Data Center for the 
MEDALPEX sea level data. The work was under-taken on behalf of PSMSL by the 
Marine Information and Advisory Service (MIAS) - U.K.'s national oceanographic 
data center (now the British Oceanographic Data Centre.) 

Sea level data were submitted to MIAS from 29 of the 40 MEDALPEX sites. An 
inventory of the data is given on the following page. Measurements from 28 of the 
sites were taken using conventional stilling wells and, with one exception, were 
supplied to MIAS as hourly values. Data from the remaining site, off the coast of 
Corsica, were collected by an Aanderaa water level recorder at half-hourly intervals. 



51 



INVENTORY OF DATA RECEIVED 
BY MEDALPEX SEA LEVEL DATA CENTER 



SITE 


LATITUDE 


LONGITUDE 


START 


SERIES 


CYCLE 








DATE 


DURATION 


INTERVAL 




DDD MM.MH 


DDD MM.MH 


DD/MM/YY 


WEEKS 


SECS 


CADIZ 


36 32.0N 


6 17.0W 


01/09/81 


56 


3600 


TARIFA 


36 0.0N 


5 36.0W 


01/09/81 


56 


3600 


GIBRALTAR 


36 8. ON 


5 21.0W 


01/09/81 


56 


3600 


CEUTA 


35 54. ON 


5 19.0W 


01/09/81 


56 


3600 


ALGECIRAS 


36 7.0N 


5 26. OW 


01/09/81 


56 


3600 


PUERTOS BANUS 


36 37.0N 


4 55.0W 




NO DATA 




MALAGA 


36 43.0N 


4 25.0W 


01/09/81 


56 


3600 


ALMERIA 


36 49. 7N 


2 29.2W 


14/08/81 


58 


3600 


CARTEGENA 


37 36. ON 


59.0W 




NO DATA 




ALICANTE I 


38 20. 3N 


30. 4W 


23/08/81 


60 


3600 


ALICANTE III 


38 20. 3N 


30. 7W 


28/08/81 


60 


3600 


PALMA DE MALLORCA 


39 33. ON 


2 38.0E 


01/09/81 


56 


3600 


BLANES 


41 41. ON 


2 48.0E 




NO TIDE GAUGE 




ROSAS 


42 15.0N 


3 11.0E 




NO TIDE GAUGE 




PORTVENDRES 


42 31. ON 


3 6.0E 


28/12/81 


39 


3600 


SETE 


43 25.0N 


3 43.0E 




NO DATA 




FOS 


43 25. ON 


4 46.0E 




NO DATA 




TOULON 


43 7.0N 


5 55.0E 


30/08/81 


56 


3600 


NICE 


43 42.0N 


7 16. OE 


03/07/81 


68 


3600 


MONACO 


43 44.0N 


7 25. OE 


29/06/81 


69 


3600 


OFFSHORE 


42 34. 8N 


8 44.0E 


06/04/82 


18 


1800 


NEARCALVI 


42 34. 8N 


8 44. OE 


29/07/82 


9 


1800 


AJACCIO 


41 55.0N 


8 43.0E 


30/08/81 


49 


3600 


CAGLIARI 


39 13. ON 


9 8.0E 




NO DATA 




SAVONA 


44 18. ON 


8 28. OE 




NO DATA 




GENOVA 


44 24. ON 


8 54.0E 


31/08/81 


58 


3600 


LASPEZIA 


44 7.0N 


9 48.0E 




NO DATA 




Lr/ORNO 


43 33. 2N 


10 18.2E 


31/08/81 


49 


3600 


CrVITAVECCHIA 


42 5.7N 


11 47.4E 


25/08/81 


22 


3600 


NAPOLI 


40 50. 4N 


14 16.2E 


31/08/81 


56 


3600 


PALERMO 


38 8.0N 


13 23.0E 




NO DATA 




ANCONA 


43 37. ON 


13 31.0E 


01/09/81 


56 


3600 


PTO CORSINI 


44 35.0N 


12 20.0E 




NO DATA 




VENEZIA 


45 26. ON 


12 20.0E 


01/01/81 


104 


3600 


KOPER 


45 33.0N 


13 44.0E 


28/02/82 


9 


3600 


ROVINJ 


45 5. ON 


13 38.0E 


28/02/82 


9 


3600 


BAKAR 


45 18. ON 


14 32.0E 


28/02/82 


9 


3600 


ZADAR 


44 5.4N 


15 16.3E 


28/02/82 


9 


3600 


NOVALJA 


44 33. 3N 


14 13.2E 


28/02/82 


9 


3600 


SPLIT 


43 30. ON 


16 26. OE 


28/02/82 


9 


3600 


DUBROVNIK 


42 40. ON 


18 4.0E 


28/02/82 


9 


3600 


BAR 


42 5.0N 


19 5.0E 


28/02/82 


9 


3600 



52 



In compiling the dataset, MIAS translated all incoming data into a common format 
with elevation values standardized to meters and times to GMT. The data for each 
site were plotted as a time series and checks were carried out for gaps or constant 
values, spikes, spurious data or pun chin g errors. Further checks were carried out 
by tidally analyzing and low pass filtering the data. Non-tidal fluctuations were 
investigated using principal component analysis. Qualifying information applicable 
to the data from each site was checked for inconsistencies and completeness, and 
appropriate documentation was stored with the data in the form of plain language 
records. The complete quality controlled dataset, including documentation, has 
been stored on a single magnetic tape formatted in GF3, the IOC's standard format 
for the exchange of oceanographic data. A copy of the data set may be obtained as 
ASCII files on floppy disk or via FTP over the internet from: 

World Data Center A, Oceanography 

NOAA 

Silver Spring, MD 20910-3282 

U.S.A. 

E-mail: wdca@nodc.noaa.gov 

or 

RNODC/MEDALPEX Sea Level Data 

BODC 

Bidston Observatory 

Merseyside L43 7RA 

U.K. 

E-mail: bodcmail@ua.nbi.ac.uk 



53 



RNODC DRIBU 



RNODC FOR DRIFTING BUOYS 

Background 

The Marine Environmental Data Service (MEDS) began operation of the 
RNODC/Drifting Buoy Data in January 1986. The RNODC acquires Drifting 
Buoy Data from worldwide sources, makes the data available to international 
scientific programs, and prepares geographical plots of Drifting Buoy locations 
and tracks for the world oceans on a monthly basis. The RNODC also provides 
monthly statistics of operational buoys and the number of messages received from 
them. 

Acquisition of Drifting Buoy Data 

There are three procedures by which Drifting Buoy Data are received by the 
RNODC. The first and more traditional is for the principal investigator to submit 
his data directly to the RNODC, or to his National Oceanographic Data Centre 
which in turn submits the data to the RNODC. For historical data sets, this is 
the only option available. Data received in this way are usually of the highest 
quality, since they have undergone the most discriminating calibration and qual- 
ity control procedures under the direction of the principal investigator; however, 
data entering the system in this manner are not sufficiently timely to meet the 
operational requirements of the major global science programs. 

The second path for data flow to the RNODC is via the GTS. An advantage of 
this procedure is that the data are available in time scales suitable for the opera- 
tional requirements of researchers in programs such as TOGA and WOCE, as well 
as for other operational users such as meteorological forecasters. Data received in 
this way may be less accurate, because they have not been fully reviewed and 
assessed by the principal investigator. For drifting buoy data, there is also a 
problem in that using the DRIBU format on the GTS for some buoys may limit 
the data that can be transmitted, because of a requirement to restrict the infor- 
mation to 256 bits. 

A third procedure involves retrieving the DRIBU data as they pass through Ser- 
vices ARGOS. Although these data still have not been reviewed and assessed by 
the principal investigator, they are an improvement over the GTS data in that 
both time of observation and position time are available to improve velocity calcu- 
lations. Data received by Service ARGOS are stored on magnetic tape for a pe- 
riod of 90 days. After this time, the tapes are reused and the data then reside 
solely in the hands of the principal investigators. Canada and the United States 



54 



have agreed to share the cost of buying copies of these tapes for the RNODC. 
Data from a buoy can only be provided to the RNODC if the principal investigator 
has given consent in writing. 

RNODC/Drifting Buoy Data Base 

MEDS utilizes a hierarchical database, called System 2000, to store the drifting 
buoy data; because of the volume of data, each year of data is stored in its own data 
base. In order to provide services to users at all time scales and to have available at 
each time scale the best data possible, the RNODC has decided to accept all data 
using the following hierarchical guidelines: 

1. Where possible, Principal Investigators are requested to make their data 
available to other operational users and to the RNODC by having the data 
transmitted on the GTS. The RNODC will copy all available data from the 
GTS, quality control it, and update it into the data base on a weekly basis. 

2. Principal Investigators are also requested to agree to have Service ARGOS 
provide a copy of their data to MEDS via tape each month whether or not 
those data have already been on the GTS. The data circulated on the GTS 
have only the one time included which poses a difficulty in calculating 
velocities. Thus, the tape data with the two times is an improvement to the 
database and will be used to replace the GTS data in the database. In 
addition, data will be picked up which could not be circulated on the GTS 
because of the format of the transmission from the buoy. 

If Service Argos has not already been supplied with the calibration 
constants, channel allocations, and algorithms, or has not been requested to 
make the conversions to physical units, there will be a requirement for the 
RNODC to obtain this information from the principal investigators. 
Principal investigators are reminded that if the sensor data cannot be made 
available, the position data itself is of value for the database. 

3. Principal Investigators are requested to provide a copy of their Drifting 
Buoy Data either directly to the RNODC when the fully processed, quality 
controlled version is available, or to provide the data to their National 
Oceanographic Data Centre, where the RNODC will be requesting such 
data on a regular basis. Data received by this path will replace GTS or 
Service ARGOS versions of the data in the database. 

By receiving data in the configuration set forth above, and replacing earlier, lower 
quality data as higher quality versions of the data arrive, the RNODC can offer 
users a choice between timeliness and quality, as dictated by their particular 
requirements. 



55 



The RNODC recognizes that in some cases there exists a need to restrict distri- 
bution of data to protect a scientist's right to benefit first from collection activities 
carried out at considerable effort and cost. It is noted that the large international 
experiments generally have data exchange agreements that state when the data are 
available to other participants and to those outside the program. The RNODC will 
honor such data exchange agreements and will, at a scientist's request, restrict 
further distribution of the data according to the terms of the pertinent agreement. 
In regard to data from individual scientists, bilateral agreements on further 
distribution of data for a period of up to two years can also be made. 

RNODC Services 

As mentioned earlier, the RNODC maintains its drifting buoy data in a data base 
structure. This provides maximum flexibility when meeting a request. While a 
number of different qualifiers may be used to retrieve data, the most common are 
area and time. Requesters may also specify all data or only those which have 
passed the quality control procedures. On output, the data can be written on 
various computer media, such as computer diskette, CD-ROM, 8-mm cartridge, 
DAT and DLT tapes, in a standard subset of the GF3 formatting system or in some 
other agreed ad hoc character format. In choosing the data format, users should be 
aware that the GF3 Formatting System is supported by a powerful and growing 
software system which is available for many of the more widely used host 
computers. Note that the data can also be downloaded using File Transfer Protocol 
(FTP) over the Internet. 

Each month, the RNODC publishes a summary of the data it has received in real 
time; also produced are global maps of drifting buoy tracks for the previous month. 
These maps are issued regularly on a monthly basis. Anyone wishing to receive 
this summary should contact the RNODC. There is no charge to receive this 
product. 

To obtain the RNODC Drifting Buoy Data Set, requesters should contact one of the 
following: 



RNODC for Drifting Buoy Data 
Marine Environmental Data Service 
Department of Fisheries and Oceans 
200 Kent Street 
Ottawa K1A0E6 Canada 



World Data Center A, 

Oceanography 
NOAA 

Silver Spring, MD 20910-3282 
U.S.A. 



Telephone: 613-990-0243 

FAX: 613-993-4658 

Email: services@meds-sdmm.dfo-mpo.gc.ca 



Telephone: 301-713-3295 

FAX: 301-713-3303 

Email: wdca@nodc.noaa.gov 



56 




TROPICAL OCEAN and GLOBAL ATMOSPHERE 

PROGRAMME 

TOGA Background 

A major component of the TOGA International Implementation Plan was the 
monitoring of the global atmosphere and the upper layers of the three tropical 
oceans during the ten -year period of 1985-1994. Existing meteorological and 
oceanographic observation systems were maintained and expanded by TOGA, 
while new networks were also installed in key locations. These observations, 
along with available historical data, have provided a description of the ocean- 
climate system and its variability from sub-seasonal to interannual scales. 

TOGA Tropical Subsurface Data Centers 

The TOGA Tropical Subsurface Data Centre in Brest, France operated within the 
framework of both the IOC's International Oceanographic Data and Information 
Exchange (IODE) system and the Joint IOC-WMO Integrated Global Ocean Ser- 
vices System (IGOSS). This Centre has been continued for the WOCE program as 
the Global Subsurface Data Centre. The Centre collects subsurface ocean observa- 
tions from the following sources: (1) tropical oceans observations from the IGOSS 
network; (2) additional vertical temperature profiles from XBT's and from drifting 
or moored buoys with thermistor chains, not sent over the GTS; (3) time series of 
temperature and salinity at fixed depth from moored thermistor chains; (4) sur- 
face temperature and salinity data and vertical profiles of temperature and salin- 
ity from CTD's, bottle casts, and WCTD's; and (5) other subsurface ocean mea- 
surements from process-oriented intensive oceanographic observation projects in 
the tropical oceans. 

Initially, data are collected from radio transmissions, with fully digitized and 
quality controlled observations added with time. The subsurface thermal data 
described above are analyzed, and the Centre assembles and disseminates qual- 
ity-controlled Level II-B data sets for the Global Oceans. The Centre is also re- 




s attaO 



57 



sponsible for provision of these data sets to the World Data Centers, Oceanogra- 
phy at appropriate intervals. 

WDC-A, by virtue of its collocation with the U.S. National Oceanographic Data 
Center (NODC), also has access to the Tropical Pacific Ocean data set jointly 
maintained by NODC and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), serving 
as the Joint Environmental Data Analysis (JEDA) Center. JEDA tracks, acquires, 
quality controls, and merges all available subsurface thermal data for the Tropical 
Pacific. NODC assembles, reformats and initiates quality control of the data; SIO 
performs further quality control and analysis of the data. Each yearly Level II-B 
Pacific Ocean data set undergoes the full spectrum of quality control and analysis 
by the JEDA Center; it is then provided to WDC-A. 

TOGA Sea Level Center 

The TOGA Project, realizing the importance of sea level data for research in ocean 
dynamics and for the monitoring and prediction of oceanographic processes, estab- 
lished a TOGA Sea Level Center at the University of Hawaii. The purpose of this 
Center to collect all sea level data taken by island-based and coastal tide gauges in 
the area between 30°N and 30°S during the TOGA project, and to make them 
available for research. The TOGA Sea Level Center also obtains and archives past 
sea level data for the same region, when they are made available from the origina- 
tors. Hourly, daily, and monthly values are prepared and archived, the data are 
stored digitally and are passed on yearly to other TOGA data centers, to the Per- 
manent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL), and to the World Data Centers, 
Oceanography; The Archive is maintained online, with access through the World 
Wide Web adn FTP. The TOGA Sea Level Center also supports the Global Sea 
Level Observing System (GLOSS). Sea level data has assumed greater impor- 
tance because of its utilization in the calibration of satellite altimeters, such as 
GEOSAT. Since the conclusion of the TOGA program, many of the observing 
stations have continued to provide sea level data on a regular basis. 

Through the creation of the Joint Archive for Sea Level (JASL) with the Univer- 
sity of Hawaii, the U.S. NODC is providing data management for this effort and 
assisting in the acquisition, processing, quality assurance, archiving, and dissemi- 
nation of the data. The Joint Archive for Sea Level submits sea level time series 
data updates to NODC on a yearly basis. These updates may include data from 
new stations, as well as previously unprocessed data from existing stations. In 
addition, the updates may include data previously submitted to NODC that have 
been reprocessed to improve data quality. Therefore, to update the sea level data 
files for a station already in the database, NODC completely replaces the time 
series of data for that station with a new version that may include both new and 
reprocessed data. 



58 



TOGA TAP Array 

The TOGA TAO (Tropical Atmosphere Ocean) Array provided measurements of 
surface winds, air temperature, humidity, SST, upper-ocean temperatures and 
currents. This mooring array was established by TOGA in the Equatorial Pacific. 
The array is comprised of the ATLAS (Autonomous Temperature Line Acquisition 
System) wind and thermistor chain moorings and the PROTEUS (PROfile 
TElemetry of Upper ocean currents) downward-looking Acoustic Doppler Current 
Profiler (ADCP) current measurement system. For the ATLAS moorings, surface 
winds, air temperature, humidity, SST, and sub-surface temperature at 10 depths 
down to 500 m are telemetered to shore via Service Argos serveral times a day, 
and for PROTEUS, daily-averaged velocity profiles with 8 m vertical resolution 
between 10 - 250 m are telemetered to shore in real time via Service Argos. Since 
the conclusion of the TOGA program, TAO coverage in the tropical oceans has 
been significantly enhanced. 

NODC receives periodic updates to the TAO Array data set; WDC-A provides 
updates of this data set to its counterpart WDCs. 

WDC-A, Oceanography Support to TOGA 

WDC-A, Oceanography serves as an archival center for each of these TOGA Data 
Sets. Its responsibilities are to provide TOGA data sets to requesters in the inter- 
national scientific community, at a cost not to exceed that of data reproduction 
and postage, and to provide copies of all TOGA data sets received to World Data 
Centers B and D, Oceanography in exchange. TOGA data and information are 
available from the following Specialized Data Centers: 



Global Subsurface Data Centre 

Centre IFREMER de Brest 

BP70 

29263 Plouzane, France 

Email: Marie.Claire.Fabri@ifremer.fr 



JEDA Center 

Scripps Institution of Oceanography 

University of California 

La Jolla, CA 92093 U.S.A. 

Email: wbwhite@ucsd.edu 



JEDA Center 

National Oceanographic Data Center 

NOAA 

Silver Spring, MD 20910-3282 U.S.A. 

Email: mhamilton@nodc.noaa.gov 



The Joint Archive for Sea Level 
University of Hawaii - MSB 312 
1000 Pope Road 

Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 U.S.A. 
Email: caldwell@nodc.noaa.gov 



World Data Center A, Oceanography 
National Oceanic & Atmospheric Admin. 
Silver Spring, MD 20910-3282 U.S.A. 
Email: wdca@nodc.noaa.gov 



59 




Pacific Ocean sea-level stations with quality-controlled data in the JASL archive 



1O0°E 120°E 140°E 160°E 180° 160°W 140°W 120°W 100°W 80°W 



20°N 



EQ 



20-S 



40°N 



20°N 




20°S 



100°E 120°E 140°E 160°E 180" 160-W 140°W 120°W 100°W 80°W 



Pacific Ocean TOGA "Tropical Atmosphere Ocean" (TAO) array 



60 



RNODC SOC 



SOUTHERN OCEANS DATA SET 



The RNODC/Southern Oceans (RNODC/SOC) was created in order to provide a 
regional data management and data information service for Southern Oceans physi- 
cal and chemical oceanographic data. The RNODC was created under guidelines set 
forth in Recommendation XII. 1 by the IOC's Technical Committee on International 
Oceanographic Data Exchange (IODE XII, Moscow 10-17 December 1986). 

The Terms of Reference of the RNODC/SOC include the following responsibilities: 

- Acquire, quality control, and store in standard format the physical and 
chemical data obtained by the international community from the cruises and 
research programmes carried out in the Southern Oceans; 

- Co-operate closely with the World Data Centers, Oceanography by sending 
regular shipments (at least once a year), free of charge, of complete sets of 
physical and chemical data stored on magnetic tapes in GF3, and inventories, 
data summaries, and other data products related to the physical and chemi- 
cal data from the Southern Oceans; 

- Assist the World Data Centers by sending copies to them of any ROSCOP 
forms submitted to the RNODC-SOC; 

- Co-operate with the BIOMASS Data Center, regarding exchange of data 
and inventories, as well as other data products. 

The RNODC-SOC is located in and operated by the Argentine Oceanographic Data 
Center (CEADO). 




61 



SOUTHERN OCEANS 
OCEANOGRAPHIC STATION PLOT 



90 °W 




180 



90 °E 



This plot shows the locations of 15,670 oceanographic data observations made 
in the Southern Oceans and registered in the RNODC/SOC master data file. 



62 



RNODC/SOC Oceanographic Data Set 

The RNODC/SOC data set contains data for all available oceanographic sta- 
tions for the Southern Oceans between 50° and the Antarctic Continent. Data for a 
total of 15,670 oceanographic stations taken during 387 Southern Oceans cruises 
are included in the data set. Seasonally, the data totals are approximately 2,500 
observations taken during the Austral Winter (April-September) and more than 
13,000 observations taken during the Austral Summer (October-March). Southern 
Oceans observational data taken by 19 countries have been received by the 
RNODC. 

The RNODC/SOC data set is available from: 

Argentine Oceanographic Data Center (RNODC/SOC) 
Centro Argentino de Datos Oceanograficos 
Ave. Montes de Oca 2 124 
1271 - Buenos Aires 
Republica Argentina 

Email: ceado@rina.hidro.gov.ar 

or 

World Data Center A, Oceanography 
National Oceanic & Atmospheric 

A dmini stration 
Silver Spring, MD 20910-3282 U.S.A. 

Email: wdca@nodc.noaa.gov 



63 



RNODC IGOSS 



INTEGRATED GLOBAL OCEAN SERVICES 

SYSTEM DATA SET 



Background 

The Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) is a worldwide system for 
the rapid collection, exchange and analysis of oceanographic data and the timely 
preparation and dissemination of ocean products and services. IGOSS was estab- 
lished to support oceanographic and meteorological research efforts by providing: 

(1) a global distribution of oceanographic observations, (2) a mechanism for the 
timely and effective exchange of data, and (3) the preparation of oceanographic 
analysis products capable of supporting global change and climate research stud- 
ies. IGOSS products and services can be useful for input to large scale circulation 
models, for research survey planning, and for direct application in commercial 
fisheries, recreation, commercial shipping, and search and rescue efforts. Real- 
time ocean products currently available include sea surface and subsurface tem- 
perature analyses and graphical depictions of mixed layer depths and ocean 
frontal positions. Additional analyses and data summaries available as delayed- 
mode products include: (1) ocean currents, (2) salinity, (3) distribution of pollut- 
ants, and (4) weekly and monthly temperature means. The IGOSS data are 
BATHY (profiles of temperature with depth) and TESAC (temperature/salinity/ 
current profiles with depth). 

The major operational elements of the IGOSS program are: (1) observing system, 

(2) data processing and services system, (3) telecommunication arrangements, 
(4) marine pollution monitoring, and (5) data archival and exchange. The organi- 
zational structure of the IGOSS data processing and services system consists of 
World Oceanographic Centers in Moscow and Washington and National and 
Specialized Oceanographic Centers in participating nations. Data from all coop- 
erating nations are combined in standard formats at the World Oceanographic 
Centers, and then used as input to global and hemispheric analyses for improved 
weather forecasting, global climate studies, and a variety of products for oceano- 
graphic research uses. National Oceanographic Centers provide quality control 
for data from their country entering the international exchange system via a high 
speed global telecommunications link called the Global Telecommunication Sys- 
tem (GTS) of the World Weather Watch. 




IGOSS & 



64 



Long-range data exchange and service arrangements and long-term archival 
activities for IGOSS data are performed by National Oceanographic Data Centers 
in Japan, the U.S.S.R., and the United States. These NODC's, serving as Re- 
sponsible National Oceanographic Data Centers (RNODC's) for IGOSS, compile 
archives of IGOSS data and products, assume responsibilities for specified re- 
gions of the world oceans, and deal with problems of quality control. They main- 
tain geographically sorted, updated files of observations received via the GTS. 

RNODC's/IGOSS Terms of Reference 

The terms of reference for RNODC's/IGOSS are as follows: 

1. Acquire BATHY and TESAC datasets and sub-surface temperature 
data from drifting and moored buoys from IGOSS Specialized Oceano- 
graphic Centres (SOC) for area of responsibility; apply supplementary 
quality control to acquired data and provide services to users after 30 
days from receipt of that data; 

2. Acquire non-operational BATHY, TESAC, and sub-surface temperature 
data from drifting and moored buoys and/or datasets for area of respon- 
sibility; apply quality control on non-operational data, prepare inte- 
grated datasets, and provide services to users; 

3. Maintain a data base and inventories for areas of responsibility; 

4. Prepare products based on operational and non-operational IGOSS 
data, as appropriate; also, archive and make available to users, selected 
data products provided by SOCs and analysis centres; 

5. Provide for exchange of IGOSS data with other RNODC's or to other 
users as requested; 

6. Transmit datasets, inventories of archived data, and selected data 
products to the WDCs annually; 

7. Provide for exchange of documentation and software regarding quality 
control and processing procedures, with other RNODC's, as possible; 

8. Participate in efforts to monitor data flow, and participate, as feasible, 
in IOC training programmes; 

9. Prepare inventories of available data sets of the RNODC's area of 
interest and transmit them to the IOC Secretariat semiannually. 



65 



RNODC/IGOSS - Japan 

The RNODC/IGOSS- Japan is operated by the Japan Oceanographic Data Center 
(JODC), with support from the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), which serves 
as a Specialized Oceanographic Center (SOC) for IGOSS. At the SOC, systematic 
quality control of the collected BATHY/TESAC reports is made. The SOC com- 
piles the IGOSS monthly summaries including maps showing the geographical 
distribution of BATHY/TESAC messages and numbers of messages of individual 
ships and sends them to the Secretariat of the IOC. 

IGOSS data submitted by the SOC are stored in three formats at the RNODC/ 
IGOSS. The first includes the original data file compiled on a semiannual basis. 
This file contains the collected and processed data from the GTS and other opera- 
tional sources within the area of responsibility. The second contains the data and 
data inventory files recorded in a form of the SYNDARC Format, and is available 
to users as computer-generated data summaries, statistical presentations, and 
graphical plots, or in a medium which allows the user to further process the data 
using a personal computer. During the conversion process, minimum quality 
control procedures are applied to the original data based on IOC Manuals and 
Guides No. 3. The third is the JODC-formatted version of the data inventory file. 
From this file, data products such as data summaries and location plots of obser- 
vations are provided to users, as well as to the IOC and WMO. 

RNODC/IGOSS - Russia 

The RNODC/IGOSS-Russia and SOC for IGOSS data was established in 1984 
under the auspices of the Russian Scientific Research Center for Hydrometeoro- 
logical Information and the Russian Hydrometeorological Scientific Research 
Center (Russian Hydrometcenter). The responsibilities of the RNODC/IGOSS 
include the collection of BATHY/TESAC messages and logs, quality control of the 
data, preparation of data sets on magnetic tape, and the development of products 
concerning availability and time-space data distribution. The RNODC/IGOSS also 
provides national and international users with copies of data, results of analyses, 
and with other products for its area of responsibility. 

The responsibilities of the SOC include preparation, publication, and distribution 
of different types of operational oceanographic products on a regular basis includ- 
ing those distributed via FAX machines that are readily available to different 
groups of users. 

These activities are carried out in accordance with the procedures spelled out in 
the IOC's Guide to Operational Procedures for the Collection and Exchange of 
Oceanographic Data (BATHY and TESAC), 1985 and the Guide to the IGOSS 
Data Processing and Services System. 1983 . 



66 



RNODC/IGOSS - U.S. 

The RNODC/IGOSS-U.S., located at the National Oceanographic Data Center 
(NODC), receives near real-time data weekly from the Ocean Products Center at 
Suitland, Maryland and the Ocean Applications Group in Monterey, California. 
These data are extracted from the Global Telecommunications System (GTS) on a 
daily basis for screening and editing. At the RNODC, the near real-time data sent 
by the two organizations are run through a series of programs to convert the data 
into NODC's Universal Bathythermograph (UBT) format. This data set is next 
sorted by date, time, position, and an indicator of the source of the data. The 
sorted file is then compared with existing observations and duplicates are elimi- 
nated. 

The records retained are then sorted by reference number, date, and time to pro- 
duce a cruise-ordered data set. From this final data set, inventory records are 
created. These data are then merged into the RNODC/IGOSS Archive. The 
Archive is updated on a monthly basis in geographical sequence. 

Data in the U.S. RNODC/IGOSS Archive are then available for international 
exchange and can be provided to users in a variety of forms ranging from standard 
media copies to computer- generated data summaries, statistical analyses, and 
graphic plots. 



Availability of IGOSS Data and Products through WDC-A, Oceanography 

Various RNODC/IGOSS data, analyses, and products are available through 
WDC-A, Oceanography. Upon request, WDC-A will provide copies of pertinent 
data products, or, alternatively, refer the requester to the appropriate IGOSS data 
source. 



67 



GTSPP 



GLOBAL TEMPERATURE - SALINITY PROJECT 



INTRODUCTION 

Making ocean temperature and salinity data quickly and easily accessible to users 
is the primary goal of the Global Temperature - Salinity Program (GTSPP). A 
cooperative international program, the GTSPP has now developed a global ocean 
T-S data base comprised of data that are as up-to-date and of the highest quality 
possible. Numerous IODE countries are now contributing to the program. 

U.S. PARTICIPATION 

The U.S. supports the GTSPP through the participation of its National Oceano- 
graphic Data Center (NODC). NODC fulfills several functions in support of the 
GTSPP: 

1. Data communications support. The Internet is used daily to transmit and 
receive data and project information. Real-time data are relayed from NOAA's 
National Weather Service and the Navy's Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center to 
Canada's Marine Environmental Data Service (MEDS). In addition, monthly fliers 
are transmitted to oceanography centers in Hobart, Australia; Brest, France; La 
Jolla, California; Miami, Florida; and other locations in the United States. 

2. Data quality control. All GTSPP data are passed through standard data 
quality tests, which are documented in the GTSPP Real-Time Quality Control 
Manual (Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Manuals and Guides No. 
22, UNESCO, 1990). NODC has implemented two systems to apply quality tests to 
data destined for the GTSPP database. The systems operate on UNIX-based work- 
stations that are part of NODC's client/server computing environment. One system 
displays geographical positions of observations as compared to land masses, and 
shows ship speed between observations as a check on positions dates and times. 
The second system applies tests to subsurface temperature and salinity data, set- 
ting flags to reflect test results. 

3. Database maintenance. GTSPP data are maintained in a relational database 
that is managed by commercial software on the UNIX workstation. Real-time data 
are added automatically, as they arrive from MEDS. Higher quality delayed mode 
data are also being quality controlled and added to the data base. As these observa- 
tions are added, the matching real-time data are tagged to avoid sending two copies 
of the same data. The database makes it possible to quickly load and retrieve data, 



68 



as well as to provide statistics about the number of observations per geographic 
region, time period, ship, or data type. 

GTSPP DATA 

Data in the GTSPP database are generated by ships or buoys from all regions of the 
world's oceans. Instruments used to collect the data include thermistor chains (on 
buoys), XBTs, digital bathythermographs (DBTs), bottle samplers, and CTDs. The 
data are sent in real-time (by radio or satellite transmission) and later in delayed 
mode when ships return to port. 

Delayed-mode records are generally of higher resolution than records sent in real 
time. Therefore, NODC acquires delayed mode data (usually several months after 
data were collected) and merges them into the database. To avoid duplication of 
real-time and delayed mode observations, real-time records are matched to corre- 
sponding delayed mode records in the database. In that way, the GTSPP data 
resource is built quickly from real-time records and subsequently enhanced by high 
quality, high resolution delayed mode records. 

SUPPORT TO CLIMATE RESEARCH 

NODC continues to provide monthly files of real-time data to WOCE Upper Ocean 
Thermal science centers in France, Australia, and the U.S.; each of these centers 
uses the data in ocean climate research. Results of their scientific analyses are fed 
back into the GTSPP database to enhance data quality. Also, in support of WOCE, 
NODC now produces reports of the distribution of data along TOGA-WOCE-IGOSS 
transect lines. 

GTSPP has demonstrated the feasibility of a global ocean network of data manage- 
ment and science centers. The project has shown that computer technology and 
networks, now in place, are sufficient for sust ainin g cooperative work such as that 
being done in GTSPP. Experience gained from GTSPP will be useful to future 
global ocean data management projects, such as the Global Ocean Observing Sys- 
tem (GOOS). 

To obtain information about the availability of data from the GTSPP Data Base, as 
well as participation in the Program itself, please contact the following: 

National Oceanographic Data Center World Data Center A, Oceanography 

NOAA/NESDIS E/OC 13 NOAA 

Silver Spring, MD 20910-3282 U.S.A. Silver Spring, MD 20910-3282 U.S.A. 

Email: mhamilton@nodc.noaa.gov Email: wdca@nodc.noaa.gov 



69 



ROSCOP 

REPORT OF OBSERVATIONS/SAMPLES 
COLLECTED BY OCEANOGRAPHIC PROGRAMS 

International marine data inventories, particularly the Reports of Observations/ 
Samples Collected by Oceanographic Programs (ROSCOPs 1 and 2) and their suc- 
cessor, the Cruise Summary Report (ROSCOP 3), have played a significant role in 
the success of IODE data exchange and data management for more than 20 years. 
In addition to their stated purpose of providing a means for determining the avail- 
ability of internationally exchangeable data in advance of its actual receipt, these 
inventories have also: (1) provided referral service to data not routinely exchanged 
through the WDC system and (2) supplied important documentation in support of 
processing by national and regional data centers. 

The ROSCOP scheme was initially approved by IODE at its Fifth Session in 1970 
as an interim marine data inventory, and the first ROSCOP 1 forms were received 
by the WDC in 1971. A completely revised version (ROSCOP 2) was developed by 
the Task Team on Inventories of Marine Data and Samples, and was accepted by 
IODE at its Seventh Session in 1973; ROSCOP 2 forms were first received during 
1974. Subsequently, in consideration of new requirements identified by IODE, the 
form was completely redesigned in 1989; the resulting Cruise Summary Report 
(also subtitled ROSCOP 3 for purposes of continuity), which was intended to be 
more user-friendly, was approved by IODE in 1990. 

Through the end of 1999, WDC for Oceanography had received and tabulated a total 
of 23,906 ROSCOP forms of all types (ROSCOPs 1, 2 and 3) for the twenty-year 
period. A general decline in numbers of forms received from the first half of the 
period to the last half is evident. Certain factors have obviously had a significant 
impact on the receipt of ROSCOP forms: (1) the occurrence of special projects of 
limited duration (such as the U.S. OCSEAP Program in the 1970s) that generated 
large numbers of ROSCOPs; (2) a possible overall decrease in many countries' 
national marine science programs; and (3) significant periods of policy changes or 
disruptions that impact a Data Center's activities. 

In evaluating the long-term success of the ROSCOP program, it is important to 
recognize the valuable contribution made by ICES in developing the automated 
system that facilitates utilization of information received on the ROSCOP forms. 
The automated ICES system is in use at WDC for Oceanography. Previous discrep- 
ancies between the WDC's ROSCOP tabulations and the ICES system have been 
resolved. A WDC project has now ensured that all of the WDC's historical 
ROSCOPs have been provided to ICES. 



70 



Number of ROSCOP forms and Cruise Summary Report forms received by 
WDC-A, Oceanography, as of 31 December 1999 



Country 


ROSCOP 1 Forms 


ROSCOP 2 Forms 


Cruise Summary 
Reports 


Argentina 


1 


158 


19 


Australia 


- 


89 


-- 


Belgium 


15 


13 


- 


Brazil 


-- 


106 


21 


Canada 


63 


315 


38 


Chile 


-- 


1 


-- 


Colombia 


9 


— 


-- 


Denmark 


41 


223 


-- 


Ecuador 


6 


-- 


-- 


Finland 


27 


107 


-- 


France 


100 


2,335 


748 


Germany 


513 


1,746 


1,832 


Ghana 


« 


2 


-- 


Iceland 


39 


122 


-- 


India 


32 


8 


-- 


Indonesia 


-- 


-- 


2 


Ireland 


12 


43 


-- 


Italy 


3 


-- 


-- 


Japan 


214 


1,638 


212 


Netherlands 


78 


295 


11 


Norway 


108 ! 


404 


-- 


Peru 


3 


-- 


-- 


Poland 


82 


100 


-- 


Portugal 


-- 


1 


-- 


Spain 


35 


15 


-- 


Sweden 


38 


203 


-- 


South Africa 


-- 


477 


— 


Russia 


85 


393 


-- 


United Kingdom 


614 


2,412 


622 


United States 


20 


6,304 


328 


Korea (Republic of) 


8 


58 


339 


Congo (People's Rep.) 


16 


1 


-- 


Senegal 


1 


-- 


-- 


Mauritania 


2 


-- 


-- 


Totals 


2,165 


17,569 


4,172 



71 



WOCE 



WORLD OCEAN CIRCULATION EXPERIMENT 



BACKGROUND 

The World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) is a component of the World 
Climate Research Program that seeks to investigate the role played by ocean circu- 
lation in the earth's climate system. Its goal is to develop improved ocean circula- 
tion models for use in climate prediction. The WOCE observational phase 
(1990-1997) has used satellites and in-situ physical/ chemical measurements taken 
during this largest and most comprehensive ocean observational program under- 
taken to date, in compiling a quasi-synoptic data set of unprecedented scope. 

DATA MANAGEMENT 



The WOCE Hydrographic Program (WHP) is comprised of One-Time Surveys, Re- 
peat Hydrography, and Bathymetry data taken along WOCE tracks. The One-Time 
Survey encompasses a range of physical and chemical measurements at discrete 
stations and from continuous sampling. Repeat Hydrography sections and 
time-series stations provide information on the temporal variability of the ocean in 
different seasons and years. The WHP Special Analysis Center represents the final 
stage in the hydrographic data management process, providing a globally-consistent 
data set and generating dynamical data products. Direct Current Measurements 
include data from Current Meter Moorings, Subsurface Floats, Surface Drifting 
Buoys, and Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs). WOCE Upper Ocean and 
Sea Surface Observations consist of Upper Ocean Thermal Data, Sea Surface Salin- 
ity, and Surface Meteorological Data and Surface Fluxes. Upper Ocean Thermal 
measurements are taken with XBTs, moored buoys, thermistor chains, profiling 
floats, and CTDs. 




The WOCE One-Time Hydrographic Survey 
72 



The unusually wide variety of data types observed during WOCE has required a 
somewhat different approach to data management than was employed during previ- 
ous international ocean surveys. The WOCE data management structure consists 
of the following elements: 

Data Assembly Centers (DACs) are managed by scientists, handle assembly 
and quality control of data sets, and generate data products. 

Special Analysis Centers (SACs) perform data analysis and synthesis func- 
tions, including the generation of derived data sets. 

Data Information Unit (DIU) is a central source of information on the status 
of WOCE, tracking all data collection, processing, and archiving activities, 
and acting as the primary interface between the WOCE data system and its 
users. 



Delayed Mode Sea Level 

British Oceanographic Data Centre 



WOCE International Protect Office 
Southampton Oceanography Centre 



Heal Time XBTs & Drifters 

Marine Environmental Data Services 



XBTs & WOCE Archive 

US National Oceanographic Data Centre 



WHP Office & Subsurface Floats 
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution 



Surface Met/AJr-Sea Fluxes 
Florida State University 



Surface Drifters and Atlantic XBTs 

Atlantic Ooeanographic and Meteorological Laboratory 




ADCPData 

Japan Oceanographic Data Centre 



Current Meter Data 
Oregon State University 



Bathymetry 

National Geophysical Data Centre 



Pacific XBTs 

Scripos Institution of Oceanography 



Fast Delivery Sea Level 
University of Hawaii 



WOCE Data Information Unit 
University of Delaware 



XBTs & Surface Salinity 

IFREMER 



WOCE Data System 



WOCE DATA AVAILABILITY 

Resources and expertise from almost 30 countries have been combined to produce 
an unprecedented collection of in-situ and satellite observations of the global oceans 
for the period 1990-1997. The Global Data Version 1.0 CD-ROM Series, which was 
the inaugural set of WOCE CD-ROMs, was released at the May 1998 WOCE Ocean 
Circulation and Climate Conference in Halifax, Canada. This series, prepared by 



73 



the U.S. NODC, makes available a unique and diverse set of data that can be 
expected to provide invaluable assistance to climate researchers. The 13 CDs cover 
all facets of the WOCE field program: 

Disc 1 - The Data Information Unit and Bathymetry Data 

Disc 2 - Hydrographic Program Data 

Disc 3 - Hydrographic Program Data Products 

Disc 4 - Upper Ocean Thermal Data 

Disc 5 - Subsurface Floats Data 

Disc 6 - Surface Velocity Program Data 

Disc 7 - Current Meter Moorings Data 

Disc 8 - Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) Data 

Disc 9 - Sea Level Data 

Disc 10 - Surface Meteorology Data, Pacific and Indian Oceans 

Disc 11 - Surface Meteorology Data, Atlantic and Southern Oceans 

Disc 12 - Surface Fluxes 

Disc 13 - Satellite Derived Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and 
Sea Surface Height Data 



Versions 1.5 and 2.0 of the WOCE CD-ROM Series are expected to be issued at 
appropriate intervals, as additional WOCE data sets are received from WOCE Pis. 
The WOCE CD-ROMs are available upon request from WDC-A, Oceanography and 
the U.S. NODC. 

National Oceanographic Data Center World Data Center A, Oceanography 

NOAA/NESDIS E/OC1 NOAA E/OC53 

Silver Spring, MD 20910-3282 U.S.A. Silver Spring, MD 20910-3282 U.S.A. 

Email: services@nodc.noaa.gov Email: wdca@nodc.noaa.gov 



74 



PENN STATE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 



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